Sep 10 2013

Piers of the Togean Islands

Published by at 7:58 am under Sulawesi


When people think tropical islands they tend to dwell on the natural stuff: the palms swaying in a breeze warm enough to keep you in a light sweat but not bring on a cardiac arrest; the powdery soft white sand that squeaks between the toes; the turquoise waters with hints of coral, fish, sharks and the occasional moray. But what about the piers?

That's what I'm talking about baby!

That’s what I’m talking about, baby!

We first encountered piers en masse earlier this year on Thailand’s Ko Kut, but Indonesia isn’t too shabby on that front either — Kanawa Island for example has a great one — but the Togeans in Sulawesi, well they make ‘em good there too.

Watch your cornering.

Watch your cornering.

Take the pier at Fadhila, near Palau Kapupat, for example. It has a bend to the right that draws your eye to the beachhead, but with its bad camber and wonky wood, I bet more than a few late-night star-watching, Bintang-quaffing guests have gone straight off the edge — watch out for the lionfish!

Danger Will Robinson!

Danger Will Robinson!

Then there’s the Jellyfish Lake pier. None of the wood is actually nailed down, making for all manner of slapstick ridiculousness. Once they nail it together this will become one of the most solid piers in the archipelago.

Phone reception is the least of your concerns.

Phone reception is the least of your concerns.

Not far from Jellyfish Lake you’ve got Pulau Taipi, too, home to an abandoned resort (owned by Kadidiri Paradise) and a very seriously abandoned pier.

But that’s enough on the nasty stuff. Let’s focus on the upside of Togean piers.

The backyard pier you don't want the office to phone you at.

The backyard pier you don’t want the office to phone you at.

Heading east, Lestari on Malenge has two piers, a rear one that looks over a lagoon — think hammocks and books — and a front beach pier. This is the one to head for…

Pirate Will reaches for the sky.

Pirate Will reaches for the sky.

Now let’s jump right to the other side of the archipelago, almost as far west as you can go. Meet Poya Lisa, which has an understated stubby pier.

Meet Poya Lisa.

Poya Lisa. Did they get bored?

The real attraction at Poya Lisa though is the cliff you can jump off on the far side (yeah, okay, we know this has nothing to do with piers, but we like the picture).

Take the leap: Off the back cliff at Poya Lisa.

Off the back cliff at Poya Lisa.

A short boat trip or a rather long swim takes you to Island Retreat, which does have a rather nice pier. Great for strolling, sun-baking and leaping into the sea.

A little wonky but charming. Like the resort.

A little wonky but charming. Like the resort.

Piers really come into their own when the sun dips under or pops over the horizon. Here are a few more of our favourites.

Rainy day blues at Kadidiri.

Rainy day blues at Kadidiri.

One boy, one pooch, one pier.

One boy, one pooch, one pier.

Under the pier can be nice too.

Under the pier can be nice too.

So what are you waiting for?

So what are you waiting for?

More still
» Previous post:
» Next post:

Disclaimer
Travelfish.org always pays its way. No exceptions.

Agoda logo
best price guarantee

No responses yet

Leave a Reply