Aug 02 2012

Should I do PADI or SSI?

Published by at 1:13 pm under Ko Tao


As if choosing a dive centre on Ko Tao wasn’t a big enough task in itself, you are then likely to be asked if you would prefer an SSI or PADI course. Here’s what you need to know.

Is that fish dangerous?

Is that fish dangerous?

Firstly, both PADI and SSI are internationally recognised and you can dive anywhere in the world with either certification. There are actually a multitude of dive agencies that offer certification courses, most of which as non-divers you’re likely never to have heard of: BSAC, CMAS, NAUI, ANDI, TDI, SDI and more besides are all recognised and any dive centre regardless of affiliation will accept your certification.

O.K.

You can switch and change too — you don’t have to stay with the agency that you pick for your first course. The science, skills and techniques don’t change with whatever agency you choose but the methodology can be a little different. As an example, a PADI course runs in a set order, meaning the student must complete skill A before moving to skill B, whereas an SSI course flow can be altered to suit the student. If you were having trouble mastering a skill with SSI, then your instructor is allowed to move on, get you comfortable and build your confidence with something else, and then return to that challenging technique.

I totally can't remember chapter 3's details.

I totally can’t remember chapter 3′s details.

While price should not be an overwhelming factor in choosing where to dive, consider that most centres do offer SSI a little more cheaply than PADI. They can do this as SSI allows students to borrow books during their course whereas with a PADI course it’s compulsory to have one — this is certainly a factor to consider when cramming everything into your backpack. SSI books are available for sale should you want one though, and PADI do offer an e-book too. The PADI e-book option gives you access to the book online via a scratch card log-in code, which you will receive instead of your book. In this instance, centres are allowed to loan you a PADI book for the duration of your course. As a diver, care for your environment should be very close to heart so consider whether you really do need a paper version no matter which you choose.

No test on adjectives to help explain just how good this is.

No test on adjectives to help explain just how good this is.

Both PADI and SSI now offer online learning so you can actually complete the theoretical part in front of your computer at home before you come. This will save you some time on your holiday. There is a review with your instructor in either case, so any concepts that need further explanation can be covered. The difference here is both cash and longevity: SSI’s online learning is free, whereas with PADI you will pay US$130. PADI offer you access to their system for one year from when you sign up, whereas with SSI it’s there for you all the time, even after the course. If you choose not to buy the book, you can simply log in and use the site as a review when you want a refresher later on.

The final thing that should be explained to you is about your certification card. SSI has an office on Ko Tao, so you will get your hard-earned card straight away. Centres have to either send off certification details or process them online to submit them to PADI. You can still dive straight away though and you do get a temporary card that is valid for 90 days. Your real card will be sent to the address you choose. If you are travelling then it’s best to send it home. If you are traveling for longer than 90 days, you can still have you certification checked on the PADI website.

Ultimately, it’s more important that you have chosen the right dive centre than the “right” course. If you have, then whether you choose PADI or SSI, you will be taught well — so don’t agonise, just dive in there and blow some bubbles!

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