Oct 19 2012

Hanoi street food: Banh my kebab

Published by at 3:39 am under Food


Banh my (or banh mi in Saigon) — bread — is a staple breakfast and lunch dish in Hanoi when served with a filling of pate, egg (trung) or cured pork (cha). Although banh my pate stems from the French colonial era, a more recent addition to many menus here — banh my kebabis reminiscent of a Turkish kebab, as consumed by many hungry party goers in the West.

Not a noodle in sight.

Not a noodle in sight.

Banh my kebab stalls can be found all over the city and are more high-tech and stand-out than the usual street food stalls in Hanoi. By that I mean they have a rotisserie and are usually painted yellow and/or red. The one most conveniently located for Old Quarter is on Luong Ngo Quyen, next to bia hoi corner, and another is at the junction of Phung Hung and Tran Phu, outside Anh Hoa Bakery and near Food Street.

Go on, give him something to do.

Go on, give him something to do.

Slices of pork meat are crammed onto a skewer and rotated slowly round in front of a heated element. Thin slices are carved off to order and stuffed into a Vietnamese bread roll or flat bread. The latter is my preference but not all stalls offer this option.

Nearing the end of a busy day.

Nearing the end of a busy day.

As well as the meat, the sandwich comes with vegetables and sauce. Veggie choices vary but usually include slices of cucumber and tomato, red onion, red cabbage, and sometimes coleslaw, with a sauce of chilli or mayo, or both. I recommend both. Some stalls will toast or heat the sandwich before serving, others won’t.

It’s rare to find a banh my kebab stall with seating, but some have a stool or two nearby. Take-away is more common; it really is fast-food street food. Expect to pay 20,000 to 25,000 VND per portion.

Is that bread or a carrot?

Is that bread or a carrot?

If you like the idea of kebab but don’t want food on-the-go, try the recently opened Kebab House at 12 Nha Tho, near St Josephs. Seating upstairs is fancy for a restaurant in Hanoi, let alone a kebab house: choose from a high stool at a table overlooking the street or a velvet-covered banquette at the back.

Chips: only available at the posh kebab place.

Chips: only available at the posh kebab place.

The standard pork kebab is on a par with a kebab from a street stall, and only slightly more expensive, but here you also get the choice of lamb, chicken or beef and a range of breads. The chips (fries) are good too: really crispy and greasy. I should also mention the che — the sua chua one is delicious and perfect after a kebab and chips.

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One response so far

One Response to “Hanoi street food: Banh my kebab”

  1. @tomosaigonon 26 Oct 2012 at 5:20 pm

    Noticed in Hanoi they only had regular bread. In Saigon, anyone selling Doner kebab (not that it’s a Vietnamese dish) has “proper” pita bread.

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