Finance and money forum

Using YOUR cash in SE Asia

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    This ‘post’ is about costs and charges to access YOUR cash when in SE Asia.

    There is much discussion on this topic here on TF, but often the contributions are embedded in various posts. I try here to ‘pull’ all the ideas together, and provide an overview (to the best of my knowledge and also using the contributions here on TF as information).

    It appears there are some fundamentals about using YOUR cash.

    Your home country

    1/. cash withdrawal

    Some banks charge a fee to withdraw money from a debit card account when you are overseas - even though the account is full of YOUR money. The amounts vary, but some report amounts of up to US$10 per transaction (ouch!!!. But, not all do this. In some countries, there are banks that are 'kind' to their customers and don't charge an overseas cash withdrawal fee.

    An alternative to a debit arrangement is to find a credit card provider that will allow you to pre-load the credit card and ALSO allow you to withdraw cash from either a bank (ie over the counter) or an ATM in another country.

    2/. credit advance

    One would assume that a credit card purchase comes without additional fees and charges when purchasing overseas. Sadly, this is not the case. I have noted the 'biggest' scam in the section below, so I won't digress further here.

    When looking to use a credit card, make sure you try and secure a brand (eg. like Visa or Mastercard) that has a global help desk to report lost/stolen cards. These 'big boys' are often able to get replacement cards to you quickly and not too expensively.

    IMPORTANT NOTE

    When you withdraw money from an overseas institution, be it an ATM or bank, that institution uses an 'interchange agent' to handle the money 'collection' from your bank. That 'interchange agent' will go to your credit/debit card provider and say 'please hand over XXX'. Inbuilt into that transaction is an exchange between the currency of the OS country and your country. The 'interchange agent' uses a currency exchange rate known as the mid-market rate. This is an exchange rate that is somewhere between what the highest and lowest bidder are asking to buy/sell those currencies on the day of the transaction exchange. Usually, the 'interchange agent' will add on a very small margin (about 0.001%) for doing the job.

    However, many of the the institutions (often banks) that issue the credit card on behalf of the provider have a sneaky little scam. {Here, the providers are eg. Visa, mastercard, etc.}. The bank tells its customers that there is a CURRENCY CONVERSION FEE and they blame the card provider. But this is untrue. The CURRENCY CONVERSION FEE is often in the region of 2 to 5%.

    This means that for cash advances or credit card transactions, many banks (but not all) will impose a CURRENCY CONVERSION FEE on your OS withdrawal.

    So, for a debit card withdrawal, there most likely will be a 'cash withdrawal fee', and a 'CURRENCY CONVERSION FEE'. So, to withdraw (say) US$100, you may only get to use US$92.

    For a Credit Card holder withdrawing cash from a pre-loaded account, there may only be a 'CURRENCY CONVERSION FEE'.

    Your Task/s

    Your task is to go find a debit card account that neither charges an OS cash advance fee, nor 'currency conversion fee'.

    If you fail, then...

    Your second task is to find a credit card provider that allows you to pre-load and does not charge a 'currency conversion fee'.

    I live in Australia. There is only one such provider. I have since learnt that non-bank credit card providers are most likely to offer credit cards that have no ancillary charges. An idea is to call the help desk of the major non-bank providers - like GE Money, AMEX, Visa, etc. and ask whether they can recommend such a product.

    When in SE Asia

    Nearly every ATM in most SE Asian countries are now subject to a use fee. What that means is the ATM will charge you a sum of money to use the ATM.

    Thailand - most ATM's charge 150baht (about US$4.40).
    Laos - BCEL charges 20,000kip (about US$2.40
    Cambodia - many charge US$5.
    Vietnam - 20,000 VN dong (about US$1.15).
    Malaysia - most do not charge.
    Indonesia - I’m advised no charge.
    Myanmar - not applicable

    On top of this, ATM's in each country have daily limits. In some countries, these daily limits are so low they are a rort to maximise ATM usage.

    Thailand - don’t know, but at least US$1000.
    Laos - BCEL = US$80
    Cambodia - most are US$150
    Vietnam - ANZ = 9 million VNdong (US$500), down to some at 1 million VNdong (US$55).
    Indonesia - I don’t know.

    - - -

    In some countries, especially Thailand, banks will not deal with credit card holders, referring them to their ATM’s. In Laos, banks will charge a fee similar to the ATM fee for credit card transactions. I don't know about other countries.

    - - - -

    Travellers Cheques

    Some travellers use TC’s. However, those that do often originate in countries that do not have hefty charges to purchase.

    Some countries, such as New Zealand, have high TC purchase fees. In others, such as the UK and US, some banks provide TC’s to customers without ‘load up’ costs.

    There will be a cost to cash a TC in SE Asia. However, that cost is often less than the equivalent ATM charge (in that country).

    - - -

    This ‘post’ is about charges to access YOUR cash.

    Clearly, you have control over your home country. But, little (if any) when in SE Asia.

    Some tourists ‘wear’ the SE Asia ATM charge and take out about a week’s worth of money. Others say they hide their cash, and take out larger amounts. For those wanting to ‘hide’ money, there are discussions here on TF regarding money belts, and other ‘gear’.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers

    #1 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 16:59

  • Advertisement

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    seeing as im from the Goldy as well Bruce, this kinda doesnt help me.

    What do YOU do to minimise YOUR costs?

    #2 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 18:50

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    By the way, I have a "GOLD" ANZ visa which gives me free travel insurance etc.

    If you "pre-load" the card, do you then get charged interest on cash advances?

    #3 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 18:52

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    f...
    email me - info@avvrg.org.au - and I'll explain.

    Cheers

    #4 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 18:53

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    email bounced back?

    #5 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:01

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    f

    thanks - actually that's very helpful. Try secretary@avvrg.org.au

    Cheers

    #6 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:09

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    yeah...i took my initiative and googled it haha...email was sent a while ago

    #7 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:11

  • somtam2000

    admin
    Click here to learn more about somtam2000
    Joined Travelfish
    21st January, 2004
    Location Indonesia
    Posts: 7080
    Total reviews: 24
    Places visited:
    At least 113

    A couple of notes re the above:

    On maximum DAILY ATM withdrawals:
    Most times there are two sets of charges and limits -- the local bank and your home bank. You'll wear both sets of charges and generally the lower limit carries.

    Individual limits are governed by both the currency and the type of ATM machine. Most will dispense between 20 and 40 NOTES. So in Thailand this sets you at a theoretical limit of 20,000 of 40,000B per withdrawal (assuming it is stocked with 1,000B notes). This is why managing large amounts of money in places that lack large notes, sux.

    LAOS
    BCEL daily limit is 7,000,000 kip, but the per withdrawal limit is 700,000kip (around US$80 as per the above).

    THAILAND
    Varies a lot between banks. I bank with Kasikorn and the most I've got out in a day was 180,000B -- BUT it took me nine withdrawals to get it (20k a pop). Other banks have lower limits.

    INDONESIA
    No idea on daily limits, but individual withdrawals are generally 25 notes -- so 2,500,000 Rp it is is stocked with 100k notes, 1,250,000Rd if 50's.

    CAMBODIA
    ANZ Royal individual withdrawal limit is US$2,000. Daily limit is at least $20,000 -- should be enough to keep you going.

    Travellers Cheques (TQ)
    Ask at your own bank and see what the deal is. Some banks waive the fees if you bank with them. Be sure to check the exchange rate if your travel agent is offering no fee TQs -- nothing is free!

    You will pay a fee when converting them though -- places that say no fee, generally get you on the exchange rate instead.

    BUY LARGE DENOMINATIONS. Do not buy TQs in anything under US$100 denominations. I've met a number of people travelling with very high denomination TQs in Yen, cashing the equiv of around a grand US a pop.

    Start a local bank account.
    If you're in Thailand for anything longer then a couple of months, start a local bank account. It's pretty straightforward and doesn't take long. Once it is done, wire a ***** of money from your home account into it and use the bank's ATM cards to access it. For longer term travel in Thailand, this is absolutely the most cost efficient means to manage your money.

    I'm not sure about this in other countries -- in Indonesia for example you need a KITAS to start a bank account -- which most tourists won't have. But for Thailand, this can be a very good strategy.

    What do I do?
    I'm not a good example as I have local bank accounts in Thailand and Indo so am not exposed to the same fees, but if I was, I'd start with a wad of cash, say US$500, with the balance of my funds in high denomination TQs and use the ATM card for emergency situations only. I've been burnt before relying on an ATM card -- cost me hundreds in fees.

    People scoff at TQs, but they remain an efficient way to manage your money, and, more importantly, they're quite safe -- so what if they're a bit inconvenient.

    Hope that helps & thks for the OP.

    #8 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:13

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    Im going through Malaysia, Thailand, Laos, Philippines & Bali at the end of the year and never used travellers cheques.

    Am i likely to face any difficulties if i use them?

    #9 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:21

  • somtam2000

    admin
    Click here to learn more about somtam2000
    Joined Travelfish
    21st January, 2004
    Location Indonesia
    Posts: 7080
    Total reviews: 24
    Places visited:
    At least 113

    furneburner the main hassle with TQs is that you need to find a bank or exchange office to swap them for cash. Invariably you run out of cash just after the last office closes on a Sat morning, and so, well, you're cash limited till Monday am.

    Outside of that, can't see too many major problems in using them. Using plastic is a lot more convenient, but as bm pointed out, unless you're lucky enough to have a benevolent bank (rather rare in Oz I believe!), it will cost you -- so it is a case of weighing up the convenience Vs the cost.

    #10 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:26

  • Advertisement

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    Hrm maybe its best to keep $1000 or so in cash and take travellers cheques and use my ATM card in emergencies etc...

    #11 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 19:29

  • hokasch

    Joined Travelfish
    24th December, 2008
    Posts: 45

    Only useful for people from Germany:

    DKB lets you draw cash from atm's without (bankside) fee, worldwide. You have to open an account to get the credit card with, no fees though. Never had problems with it. Other banks offering this deals, too (comdirect, etc).

    #12 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 20:25

  • idreamofdur-
    ian

    TF writer
    Click here to learn more about idreamofdurian
    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2008
    Location Singapore
    Posts: 576
    Total reviews: 4

    somtam - As far as I'm aware, tourists cannot open a bank account in Thailand. When I was living there ~2 years ago none of the banks would deal with me until I had my work permit papers completely processed (Bank of Ayudhya, Siam Commercial, etc.).

    I just did a quick search of the ThaiVisa forums, and it seems that Kasikorn Bank in Bangkok is one of the rare banks that will let you open an account with just a tourist visa.

    #13 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 20:33

  • tails101

    Joined Travelfish
    1st April, 2006
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 105

    For UK travellers, the Nationwide Cash Card is probably the best deal as it charges you nothing to withdraw money from the ATM i.e. no currency loading or withdrawal fees (except those levied by the owner of the machine). It is literally a cash withdrawal card and can't be used for purchases.

    I have a Nationwide Debit card and I get charged the 0.84% fee levied by Visa to Nationwide - however, again no commision on the actual exchange rate or withdrawal fees. Works out 84c for every $100 I withdraw, which I can live with...

    I'm off to Cambodia, Malaysia and Thailand for 2 weeks shortly and am taking £50 in each currency as cash, probably £50 in US TChq as an emergency and will use my ATM for my other cash needs. I envisage using my Nationwide CC to pay for accomodation in most cases, which again only charges 0.84% on purchases, but as a credit card attracts cash advance fees if you withdraw money using it.

    I have to confess I didn't do my research before my year travelling 5 years ago and gave HSBC over £200 in cash withdrawal fees/exchange rate commision... ouch! Lesson learnt since!

    #14 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 21:48

  • idreamofdur-
    ian

    TF writer
    Click here to learn more about idreamofdurian
    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2008
    Location Singapore
    Posts: 576
    Total reviews: 4

    tails: I use HSBC here in Singapore and they're absolutely awful. Their international fees are insanely high for a bank that likes to call themselves "The world's local bank".

    FOR CANADIANS : The lowest foreign withdrawal fee that I've found is with President's Choice Financial. I pay $3 CAD per withdrawal and have successfully used it everywhere from Brunei to Bulgaria...

    #15 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 22:00

  • Nokka

    Joined Travelfish
    6th April, 2009
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 259

    I use the Nationwide Debit card also; wherever I've used it in the world I've always received the amount of money I've requested. Its a few years since I was last in Thailand, but I'm sure that was the case then. Is this a new charge?

    Let me get this straight. Are you saying that if I ask for, say, 5000 baht from an ATM I will only be given 4850 ?

    What do people do about cash in Laos if you can only get out $80 each day ? My wife and I are to travel for several days where there are no ATMs; how can we stock up on cash ?

    #16 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 22:18

  • tails101

    Joined Travelfish
    1st April, 2006
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 105

    I believe most ATMs in Thailand now add a 150 baht charge, so if you request 5000B, you will actually be debited the equivalent of 5150B. At least that was how Vietnamese ATMs handled the charge they applied, so I'm guessing it will be the same in Thailand.

    I found $80 a day went a long way in Laos - or at least on my usual budget !?! - but if you need more cash than this daily, you'll have to go with TChqs and change tham at a bank.

    #17 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 22:28

  • idreamofdur-
    ian

    TF writer
    Click here to learn more about idreamofdurian
    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2008
    Location Singapore
    Posts: 576
    Total reviews: 4

    The 150B ATM fee in Thailand went into effect on April 17, 2009.

    Nokka - for Laos it's not a bad idea to bring a wad of foreign currency (USD, Euro) and use it to pay for your big expenses like hotels. Laos is cheap so $80 should last you a few days, otherwise you can visit the ATM every day when you're in Vientiane or Luang Prabang to stockpile some cash.

    #18 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 22:29

  • tails101

    Joined Travelfish
    1st April, 2006
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 105

    Oh, and yes, it is a fairly new charge... Here's the link to the orginal Travelfish discussion... http://www.travelfish.org/board/post/thailand/6007_new-bank-charges-for-atm-withdrawls

    #19 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 22:30

  • Nokka

    Joined Travelfish
    6th April, 2009
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 259

    Nothing surprises me with the way banks behave at the moment.

    Looks like we'll have to take out larger amounts than normal from the ATMs in Thailand and use the Nationwide credit card a bit more.

    Totally baffled by Laos's stance, though. I appreciate $80 can go a long way there, but for 2 of us, for 4 days without an ATM ? This strategy must really appeal to the high-rollers most countries wish to attract !

    Thinking this through, I believe most Laos businesses accept baht as well as $, so will probably load up on baht before entering. The only people I can see this benefiting are muggers 'Hey, the stupid tourist, they have even MORE cash on them now'.

    #20 Posted: 10/9/2009 - 22:58

  • smash

    Joined Travelfish
    21st June, 2009
    Posts: 162

    Think I'll be doing travellers cheques. New Zealand banks rape and pillage... Can't find anything account/creidt card wise that looks appealing. And those travelex cash passports are a rip off.

    #21 Posted: 11/9/2009 - 01:15

  • mlr

    Joined Travelfish
    3rd May, 2009
    Posts: 31

    If you are from the UK, Caxton FX do a global traveller currency card which you pre-load in pounds stirling. It is a mastercard and has no withdrawl or currency conversion fees.

    To load it, it is extremely straight forward and can be done via text or online (£100 minimum load applies) and the money is useable on the card within 2 hours.

    We will be using one along with our debit & credit cards as back up when travelling around SE Asia at the end of the year.

    #22 Posted: 11/9/2009 - 01:32

  • somtam2000

    admin
    Click here to learn more about somtam2000
    Joined Travelfish
    21st January, 2004
    Location Indonesia
    Posts: 7080
    Total reviews: 24
    Places visited:
    At least 113

    Nokka, idreamofdurian: the daily limit in Laos is 7,000,000 kip (around $800) the limit on an individual withdrawal is 700,000 kip (around $80). See the BCEL website for more info:
    http://www.bcellaos.com/international_card_service.php

    As already mentioned in the OP it's not an ideal way of getting your moolah because of the high fees as a percentage, but you will be able to withdraw more than $80 a day...though that really is a lot of BeerLao!

    #23 Posted: 11/9/2009 - 05:09

  • somtam2000

    admin
    Click here to learn more about somtam2000
    Joined Travelfish
    21st January, 2004
    Location Indonesia
    Posts: 7080
    Total reviews: 24
    Places visited:
    At least 113

    Sorry, forgot to add that much of the above is also available on Travelfish here:

    How to manage your money while travelling in Asia

    Cheers

    #24 Posted: 11/9/2009 - 06:44

  • Puggles

    Click here to learn more about Puggles
    Joined Travelfish
    31st August, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 59

    I am still really confused on what I should do. I am an Australian and by nature of being a gal, and an Aussie, I already have various credit cards including MC, Amex and Visa.

    My husband and I are travelling to VN in Oct/Nov for 3 weeks. We have a little over $5k in the kitty in which to use as we choose. We are hoping to make one or 2 larger 'homeware' style purchases also to send home separately.

    I am under the impression that in the Nth we will need VND and USD in more populated cities and tourist areas. I had originally planned to exchange some of our savings into VND and USD before heading over and use ATMs where possible while in Vietnam. I have several bank accounts, two with major banks Cmmonwealth and ANZ and another with a Credit Union and have debit cards with all these.

    Reading this though makes me think I should actually be looking at TCs instead?? I am confused. Help. :)

    #25 Posted: 13/9/2009 - 11:33

  • furneburner

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2009
    Posts: 180

    Bruce helped me out and pointed me to
    www.wizardclearadvantage.com.au

    This mastercard has no interational processing fees. Ive already applied for it.
    However, in vietnam you will get charged 20,000 dong i think to withdraw using any atm. However, if you use a normal credit card or atm card you will pay an extra 2% approx for each transactio and many will charge an extra $5 or so per transaction.

    There is nowhere you should NEED usd in vietnam, its just more convenient as far as i'm aware.

    Once i have this card, i think i will just take $1000 or so in cash, but take my normal atm card as well seeing as Mastercard is not accepted anywhere. Hope that helps.

    #26 Posted: 13/9/2009 - 12:33

  • Puggles

    Click here to learn more about Puggles
    Joined Travelfish
    31st August, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 59

    Thanks, I wasn't sure about the USD bit. I am hesitant about applying for yet another cc so I think I'll go with TCs and cash perhaps?

    #27 Posted: 14/9/2009 - 07:57

  • kukuruza

    Joined Travelfish
    29th October, 2009
    Posts: 13

    seeing as im from the Goldy as well Bruce, this kinda doesnt help me.

    #28 Posted: 3/11/2009 - 20:42

  • ano_1

    Joined Travelfish
    9th September, 2009
    Posts: 20

    Which credit card, available in Australia is Bruce referring to in his initial post?

    thanks ano

    #29 Posted: 4/11/2009 - 06:38

  • Rohan

    Joined Travelfish
    16th June, 2009
    Posts: 63

    I would say Bruce is talking about the Wizard Mastercard that Furneburner refers to above. I use one, and it allows me to load it with cash and has no currency fees.

    #30 Posted: 4/11/2009 - 06:55

  • Honchar

    Joined Travelfish
    30th December, 2009
    Posts: 4

    I'm traveling from Toronto Canada to Vietnam HCMC. on Jan.19, I'm planning to bring USA $ with me and converting to the Vietnam Dong. I can't find a currency exchange to convert where I am in Ontario, any suggestions as to where I should do the conversion.

    #31 Posted: 6/1/2010 - 13:33

  • yvpsquad125

    Joined Travelfish
    10th January, 2010
    Posts: 4

    Hello All,

    Im travelling to Thailand in Feb for the month and have a budget of about 1000USD. Would It make sense for me to bring 50%TC's, and then the rest US cash to BKK and prepay 250$ to a VISA Debit(To avoid international bullcrap from Wells Fargo), keeping 250$ for petty cash. And as a back up my Wells Fargo Visa.

    If anyone can tell me if this sounds feaseable I would be forever in their debt.

    Also, where would it be the best place to convert USD to baht?

    Thanks!!

    #32 Posted: 10/1/2010 - 15:01

  • Rohan

    Joined Travelfish
    16th June, 2009
    Posts: 63

    Posted from within Vietnam.

    Honchar

    I'm not sure anyone does dong outside Vietnam. If you take it out of the country with you, I've heard it becomes worthless as youy can't change it, so you need to spend it all before you leave.

    #33 Posted: 11/1/2010 - 08:19

  • somtam2000

    admin
    Click here to learn more about somtam2000
    Joined Travelfish
    21st January, 2004
    Location Indonesia
    Posts: 7080
    Total reviews: 24
    Places visited:
    At least 113

    Honchar: Vietnamese dong is a non-convertible currency outside of Vietnam - ie it is worthless.

    yvpsquad125: Do your currency conversions in Thailand -- you'll get a better rate. Other than that your plan makes sense.

    #34 Posted: 11/1/2010 - 14:06

  • Honchar

    Joined Travelfish
    30th December, 2009
    Posts: 4

    Rohan/Somtam, thanx for the info, yep, I'll plan to spend all the dong before I "get out of Dodge"
    Honchar

    #35 Posted: 16/1/2010 - 07:55

  • Puggles

    Click here to learn more about Puggles
    Joined Travelfish
    31st August, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 59

    Hi all,

    An update on how we handled our cash in Vietnam last year. Initially, we coverted some of it to US dollars and to Vientamese Dong before we left Australia. This was so we had something to start with until we found our feet.

    Once the initial dollars and dong ran low we used ATMs all around Vietnam. There was one (I can't recall which bank it was though) that we could not use our Credit Union debit card on but they all accepted our other debit card.

    To be honest, for future trips I will exchange a few dollars at the airport on arrival just to buy a coffee or whatever, and I will only use my debit cards. It was so easy and we were able to withdraw quite solid amounts for our spending sprees all over Vietnam (we travelled as far north as Bac Ha/Sapa and as far Sth as HCMC).

    There were ample atms in most populated places and the fees, all in all, really didn't amount to a lot of money. To be honest, I didn't tally them up but I would think they totalled no more than about $30 -$40 maximum over the 3 weeks we were there and we were spending VERY heavily and using them often.

    For the convienience of using ATM's instead of carrying loads of cash or travellers cheques, the charges were worth it I feel.

    #36 Posted: 14/4/2010 - 13:06

  • Jam_Mac

    Joined Travelfish
    21st April, 2010
    Posts: 1

    idreamofdurian - You say that pc financial has the best rate, do the pc debit cards for sure work in Thailand? I'm leaving tomorrow morning and pc says "they can't guarantee" that they will work. My card only has the interac symbol on it.
    Thanks!

    #37 Posted: 21/4/2010 - 03:12

  • Erikama

    Joined Travelfish
    18th June, 2011
    Posts: 1

    Financial institutions, stores and government are presently involved in a debate. The big battle on Capitol Hill is over a thing called interchange costs on debit cards and debit cards. Paying massive financial institutions whenever a customer utilizes a card isn't pleasant, and a lot of companies try to discover ways around having to pay a bank for money they are owed. I found this here: Merchants moving away from debit and credit cards

    #38 Posted: 18/6/2011 - 17:48

Have questions? Jump to our menu of forum quicklinks

Add your reply

Your reply

Check this box if you want to be notified of replies.

Please be familiar with our user guidelines before you post. Thanks!

Businesses planning on plugging their guesthouse / hotel / karaoke bar should read our "Addition guidelines" very carefully.

You need to be logged in to answer an existing post on the Travelfish forums. Please login via the prompts just above and refresh this screen -- before writing your post -- and you'll be in business.