Motorbiking in Asia forum

Good motorbike route

  • Johannes

    Joined Travelfish
    17th March, 2009
    Posts: 2

    Hello everybody,

    i am planning to rent a motorbike (or scooter) for 7-14 days and going to trek thailand, i was wondering if anybody ever done this before and if anybody knows a good route...? i was thinking north of thailand, around chang mai? but other suggestions are gladly apreciated!

    i was also wondering if it was possible to return my bike at an other place, and if it will be a big hassle when i dont have a license (got experience though).
    furthermore, if anybody knows a good place to rent, or what i should pay, that would be great asswell!

    thanks in advance!

    #1 Posted: 17/3/2009 - 11:57

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  • Thaiman

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    Hi Johannes
    I've never done this but I would suggest that if you hire a motor bike etc from a certain place they will want it back.They're not like Hertz.Also,I believe the place you hire it from will want to keep your passport to make sure the bike is returned.And I'd definately get an International driving licence.

    #2 Posted: 17/3/2009 - 12:57

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
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    You have no licence??????

    Biking in Thailand is NOT for the inexperienced.

    You could probably hire a large bike at almost any tourist venue - however when it comes to insurance you'll be on a hiding to nothing - and on top of that you'll probably find that your holiday insurance doesn't cover you for any healthcare arising out of biking either.

    Many hire companies will accept any ID in return for your money, what they don't explain is that you aren't covered for insurance unless you have a Thai licence or an international licence recognised by the Thai govt.
    Exopenses could include - your hospital treatment, that of any other person on your bike or the other vehicle(s), fines, bail, damage to bike other vehicles and property - all-in-all it could turn out extremely expensive.

    Furthermore most bike hire companies don't expect you to go beyond the confines of the town where you rented the machine - so taking it on a tour may well be a no-no.

    as for one way hire - that would either be non-existent or as rare as rocking horse shit.

    Having said all that If you can get a reliable company, with reliable machines - and this will be at a premium - a M/C tour could be pretty awesome.
    I suggest you google bike hire in Thailand and see what comes up - there may be companies in Bangkok that you could use.

    #3 Posted: 17/3/2009 - 16:24

  • Tilapia

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    There are loads of great routes to do, and many are loops so you will finish where you start without backtracking. Here is a great site for the kind of info you're looking for ...

    http://www.gt-rider.com/index.html

    You don't need any kind of licence to get a scooter. I'd be shocked if you were ever asked for one. For a larger bike? Perhaps.

    You can rent for the day, week, or month. The longer you rent, the less expensive the cost. Last time I rented it was B200 per day, B180 (per day) for 2 days, and something like B1000 for 7 days. I rented for 2 days, left the guy my passport, and didn't pay any deposit or for any insurance. I was confident that my passport would be fine as the place renting was associated with a very well established guest house operation, and had a safe.

    Often, you do need to leave your passport. It's their insurance that you'll be back. If you are renting for a while (like a week or two) I'd never leave it, and I'm not so sure you'd get much argument from someone renting. You may need to leave a deposit, though, together with a photocopy of your passport.

    Most scooters being rented out don't go much over 60 km/hr. No problem if you're not in any hurry.

    My favourite areas to ride are in Issan along the Mekong River (all of it!) Light traffic, nice and quiet towns and villages, great people, and terrific scenery.

    Usually, if you get into an accident, you (the foreigner) pays.

    My out of country health insurance covers me, but ONLY if I'm wearing a helmet. So, make sure you keep it on. Get one with a visor to cover your eyes, too.

    #4 Posted: 17/3/2009 - 22:28

  • Tilapia

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    I'd also check this website for potential routes ...

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/

    It's a site for cyclists, but good cycling routes in Thailand are usually great for scooters, as well. Plus, much of the info is recent and you'll get lots of information regarding places to stay, distances, up-to-date road conditions, GPS info, and alternative/side routes.

    Have a good time. You're going to love it!

    #5 Posted: 17/3/2009 - 22:31

  • somtam2000

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    I've done most of the north on a scooter -- one trip we did 3,500km in three weeks -- rental guy almost died when he saw the mileage!

    One sample route is outlined here: http://www.travelfish.org/feature/19 but there's plenty of other options and the other websites listed above are great resources.

    Also agree re Wilko's comments on not for beginners -- I've never been asked for a license (I don't have one) but have heard stories of lack of license being extremely problematic after accidents -- both with authorities and travel insurance. So, if you can get a license before you leave, that's a good idea.

    #6 Posted: 18/3/2009 - 09:51

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
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    I must say that I think some of the advice given here is verging on reckless - you will NOT have fully comprehensive insurance without a licence - an International or Thai are the only ones that guarantee that.

    As for "you do need to leave your passport. " - that has to be one of the most stupid comments ever on this site!

    NEVER give your passport away.

    Apart from any hassles you may get trying to get it back in the event of an accident - e.g. fly home to hospital - it is ILLEGAL to be in Thailand without ID - your passport is your ID - you could well be locked up if the police find you without one.

    #7 Posted: 19/3/2009 - 10:19

  • Tilapia

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    Wow Khunwilko! I wasn't aware that you have been in touch with my insurance company. I thought I'd done my homework by checking before I left (twice), but I should have just come to you so I could be misinformed.

    Since when was leaving your passport in a guest house/hotel safe wreckless or stupid?

    Looking forward to your next "cut and paste" contribution to the forum.

    #8 Posted: 19/3/2009 - 19:49

  • exacto

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    i've left my passport with motor scooter rental places dozens of times and never had a problem. it's pretty standard all over thailand as a deposit on the motor bike. i can definitely see why someone might be uncomfortable leaving their passport, but there have only been a very few times when a shop was willing to rent me a bike without taking my passport as a security deposit.

    what they will often do is make a photo copy for me so that if there is any need to identify myself, i can use the photo copy. (most shops also give you a receipt, in English, for the passport :-) when i lived in thailand i also carried a photo copy of my passport in my wallet, since carrying my passport around with me at all times for 4 years just wasn't practical.

    i would be interested to hear from folks who rent motor scooters in thailand and have figured out a way not to leave their passport.

    in the old days, i needed my passport to cash a traveller's check and to check into a hotel. but with ATM's, i rarely use TC's now and hotels aren't nearly as concerned with my passport as they used to be.

    i also found this quote from the thailand holiday homes website about driving in thailand. it says:

    All drivers must hold a current, non-probationary license either Thai or from their own country but if it is not Thai or English they must carry an English translation or an International driving license. A valid passport must be carried at all times. You will need a Thai driving license as opposed to an international drivers license once you have been in Thailand for more than 3 months.

    kind of a catch 22, huh! some other websites state that you need to have an international drivers license, not just the one from your home country.

    cheers.

    #9 Posted: 20/3/2009 - 11:59

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
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    When it comes to clueless, you really take the biscuit.!

    You are suggesting leaving your passport with a motorcycle rental company is a sensible thing to do - I think it is the act of an idiot!
    If you have any sort of problem that involves the police on your travels, what are you going to do when they ask for your passport - which they inevitably will!!!!! – oh - it’s somewhere in the next town?

    As I pointed out it is your only legal ID which you have to carry by law in Thailand.

    Now let’s assume your motorcycle accident doesn't kill you – that, in your case, will be where your troubles begin - do you seriously suggest that your travel insurance will cover you for third party claims resulting from a motor incident- let alone fully comp – rubbish!
    If your bike is street legal they might pay some or all of your medical bills – but that’s not the half of it........

    The rental company will want a new bike – remember, they still have your passport – and the other people involved will all want their pound of flesh.

    Remember it’s not your own hospital bills you want to worry about either– it’s the other people’s, their vehicle property etc etc – the bills just start mounting

    If the bike is over 150cc the chances are it won’t even have a blue book – i.e. be street legal. – you can check for the square tax certificate attached the bike – no plate – no book.

    Any one of these circumstances can lead to an insurance company withdrawing all financial support.
    Couple this with the way the police tend to deal with incidents in Thailand and you are on a hiding to nothing – they will simply turn round and suggest you pay a large sum of money to the other person (a percentage of which they keep!) – whether it’s your fault or not – Should you decide to argue the toss they will lock you up until you pay bail (usually covered by insurance – does your company pay that?) or until the case comes to court – which can take months.

    Even if you don’t have an incident, you may simply be stopped for a spot check by the police – this is usually sorted by a payment of 200 baht – but on finding you have no passport, registration and therefore no insurance you can be sure that the officer will have a field day – you’ll be his Christmas!

    It is so simple to avoid these problems
    Get an international licence
    OR
    Get a Thai licence – not difficult at all
    Rent from a reputable company – with bikes this is very difficult to sort out
    Get a clear indication of what kind of insurance you have
    Tell them where you intend to go

    #10 Posted: 20/3/2009 - 12:21

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  • Tilapia

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    Johannes,

    Go for the scooter. It's easy, cheap, and far from being the headache this thread seems to have become.

    Just to clarify a couple things, seeing as this might be in order ...

    I said, "Usually, if you get into an accident, you (the foreigner) pays." Insurance or no, licence or no. I only know a handful of people who have been in accidents that didn't just involve falling off their bikes. They were hit by Thai drivers or bikers. None of them were faulted for what happened, and none of them had any trouble. All were helped out as much as possible. They did have to pay for damage to the scooters. All of them had to pay their own hospital bills. None of them had out of country medical. Most were patched up pretty bad.

    When renting scooters, I carry a card for the place where the scooter was rented. If they don't have any, ask them to write one out for you with the telephone number. You may break down, you may run out of gas, you may get ripped off. At least you'll have a contact if you're out of town (and, no, I have never been asked if I am going to go outside of the city boundaries), and you'll be hard pressed not to find someone with a mobile phone.

    I have been stopped 4 times by the police in Bangkok, patted down, bag emptied, i.d. checked. I never had my passport. Each time it was in the guest house. No problem. Apologies and then they'd be on their way. I might be an exception, but I don't think so. I carry photocopies of my passport, my Dept. of Agriculture Employee card, my volunteer card, as well as a card with my name, home address, etc. written in Thai. Overkill! Unless the police catch you carrying something illegal, you are not going to have an issue with them. They are not as bad as they are being made out to be.

    KW, here's what I said ... "Often, you do need to leave your passport." Here's how you took it ... "you do need to leave your passport. " Get it right.

    >> that has to be one of the most stupid comments ever on this site!> When it comes to clueless, you really take the biscuit.!

    #11 Posted: 20/3/2009 - 22:33

  • Tilapia

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    My last line was not included. It says ...

    Keep these kinds of comments for the Thorn Tree Cafe, where it belongs.

    #12 Posted: 20/3/2009 - 22:38

  • exacto

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    hello again.

    tilapia,

    if it makes any difference, i think wilko was referring to me as the clueless one rather than you in his last post.

    wilko,

    you can imply that i'm an idiot if you like. more power to you for your extra cautious approach to this situation. and while you've suggested that some of the other posts in this thread are reckless, i think your comments border on alarmist, and more importantly, are uncharacteristically agressive. you could have made your point just as well and perhaps even better without the name calling.

    i definitely respect your point of view on motor scooter rental. i agree that it is a risky proposition and that riding scooters in thailand is not for the novice. and i can definitely see why you think parting with one's passport is not wise.

    but i really have done this dozens and dozens of times without incident. plus, i suspect that your view of the thai police is a bit more sinister than reality. hopefully that view wasn't the result of a series of unhappy experiences.

    anyway, good on ya for sharing your view, but like i said, i'm surprised at the vehemence of your remarks, since we've always been friendly on here in the past. hopefully that will still be the case in the future. cheers.

    #13 Posted: 21/3/2009 - 08:52

  • Johannes

    Joined Travelfish
    17th March, 2009
    Posts: 2

    Hello guys,

    i see my question got a discussion started. which i am not going to get involved in. I just want to add that i do have experience, i rode a scooter in India for 1 month, and for my opinion India is way worse then Thailand.

    but to get back on the subject, tilapia told me that he really liked to ride in Issan along the Mekong River. this is the information i am looking for does anybody have any advices which places they realy liked?
    tilipia, which places you liked becides that? and somtam2000 which places should i visit in your opinion? maybe anybody else had some great experiences they like to share?

    Greetz

    Johannes

    #14 Posted: 21/3/2009 - 19:10

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
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    Posts: 560

    You might also want to get onto this thread...


    http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/Massive-Police-Crackdown-Non-Regis-t245546.html&s=686cf3eaf198fe057520b8406302eb43


    There are links on this site to tours/insurance and all things connected to biking in Thailand.
    you might also want to google motorcycle Thailand and follow what comes up.

    I would be very surprised in medical bills and payouts to third parties would be as high in India as they are in Thailand!

    #15 Posted: 22/3/2009 - 11:20

  • khunwilko

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    Both Tilpia and Exacto - your are on a hiding to nothing - your attitude is foolhardy and irresponsible - there are 65 million people in Thailand - your own -erroneous and limited experience is not a good sample - iof you leave your passport and goon a tour youare a fool - nothing short of that.
    If you have an accident uninsured you are not just a fool to yourself, you are a fool to the people who's lives and property you damage and cannot recompense - you are a fool to the family and friends who have to bail you out - you are a fool hospitals and emergency services who have to sort you out - you are a fool to the corruption and bribery system you have ot subscribe to to get your self out of the shit - in fact you should be bared from driving in Thailand. remember it is you who are being selfish in thuis - your actions can affect others

    #16 Posted: 22/3/2009 - 11:29

  • exacto

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    johannes,

    hello. there is some solid, detailed information that may be useful for you on places to visit and stay along the Mekong/Isan region in the following thread. it is:

    http://www.travelfish.org/board/post/thailand/5365_following-the-mekong-from-nong-khai--tilapia--

    i'm looking to do a trip along the Mekong on my next trip in December. should be great. the irony is that since i'll have friends with me, i may have to wind up renting a car for that part of the trip! LMAO. cheers.

    #17 Posted: 22/3/2009 - 12:01

  • Tilapia

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    Exacto and Johannes,

    I've got an idea. Why don't I just continue on the other post that was posted into your (Exacto's) post above? Makes more sense.

    Johannes, follow the link in Exacto's post. That is, if you don't mind information that comes from both erroneous and limited experience (whatever that means.) ={:?D)

    Cheers.

    #18 Posted: 23/3/2009 - 02:22

  • brianennion

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    An alternative to leaving your passport is a second licence.. When in phuket I drove on my Singapore licence and handed my Thai car licence to the rental (guest house). To be honest.. Unless you read Thai and know what is going on.. There is very little chance of making sure your bike is 100% legal and insured..
    I consider the training I had in Singapore over 3 months and $1000 SGD cost far more valuable than the ride around the paddock here to get a licence. So took the 'chance'. After all.. you can get hit crossing the road so easily. ( nothing to stop you getting another licence before you leave home.. Report it lost if they don't allow two. use the 'lost' licence as the bike guarantee ;-)

    The funny thing is.. Thailand would not convert my SGP licence to Thai as it was only 150cc.. This was 4 years ago. I went and converted my car licence last Wednesday. to one of the new licences in English, they look more professional.. (No more, hand you the licence and laminating it yourself!).

    Whilst at the licence centre. I tried my luck and asked again.. Bingo.. Sure, no problem.. no theory test or practical.. Just the usual co-ordination and medical certificate.. BUT. I did need my work permit.. So you can't get a Thai licence unless you have official paperwork saying your are working or some other right to be here.. e.g. not a tourist and a like.

    I never carry my passport around with me.. Neither do any of the other 40 + Farang I know in BKK.. I have had the one time shake down asking for it.. I said it is at the Embassy.. showed my copy and that was that.. I would rather get a fine than carry it around and have it go missing.. I can pay a lot of fines for 200 Australian dollars to replace my passport, not mentioning the inconvenience.

    #19 Posted: 16/6/2009 - 17:35

  • MADMAC

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    I don't know ANYONE who carries their passport around with them. That's asking to lose it. Having said that, I would damn sure keep a copy on me. I'm also not sure I would want to leave it with the rental company. I address this a little more below.

    I do agree with Khunwilko that I would get an intenational drivers license. It's very easy to do. I got one, and I get stopped all the time at checkpoints, which are frequent (cops can't read it anyway).

    I don't think you should get a small bike if you want to tour. They are far less comfortable and they are so slow they're dangerous on the open road. You need to keep pace with the flow of traffic. A Honda Phantom or Kawasaki Boss are about the smallest bikes I would consider.

    As for leaving my passport with the rental company... I don't know. I wouldn't want to leave my passport with anyone other than the hotel safe. Not because I am concerned (as Khunwilko was) about a police shakedown. A copy of your passport and your drivers license should cover the ID issue. I've heard BKK cops are dicks, but out here they are easy to get along with and I know no one who's been shaken down for money - hell a friend of mine put his pickup in the ditch when he was drunk and the cops helped it get it out!!! Don't hurt anyone, don't get mouthy, smile a lot and say you're sorry and act contrite and you can get out of all but buggery on the streets. But if the company doesn't require you to leave a passport, then it's going to require you to leave a credit card - and that would make me even more nervous!!! No easy answer to this one. You'll have to use your best judgement.

    I highly recommend riding the Mekong - from Khemerat up to Nong Khai and on to Loei, this is a nice ride. Mukdahan is a nice city with some decent night life, That Phanom has one of the oldest Chedi's in Thailand and some very nice river front restaraunts. Nakhon Phanom is loaded with history and ambience and has the best bar I've ever been to in Isaan (near the Vietnamese clock tower). From NKP to Nong Khai it's small towns, very scenic, little traffic. You can rent from the following location:

    TOH MOTORS CO., LTD.

    1226/27-32, Somdhavilraj, Opposite The Taksila Hotel, T. Talat, A. Mueang Maha Sarakham, Mahasarakham 44000, Thailand

    TEL: 0066 43 721 511

    That's the only one I know of in Isaan.

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.

    #20 Posted: 17/6/2009 - 02:37

  • grndhouse

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    what size is a normal motorbike over there?
    is riding with your girl on the back an option or not really?

    #21 Posted: 17/6/2009 - 12:37

  • grndhouse

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    what size is a normal motorbike over there?
    is riding with your girl on the back an option or not really?

    #22 Posted: 17/6/2009 - 12:38

  • grndhouse

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    what size is a normal motorbike over there?
    is riding with your girl on the back an option or not really?

    #23 Posted: 17/6/2009 - 12:39

  • khunwilko

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    There's a CC limit - but it doesn't seem to work.
    I think the law was that you couldn't make/sell anything over 150cc. but the Phantom etc are 200cc (wouldn't be seen dead on one of them)
    You can get hold of loads of machines way over that size but they probably have come into being as spare parts and have a strange blue book that describes them as something they aren't.

    The normal Thai bike is a step-through about 100 to 125 cc. Some are quite nippy, but not really the stuff of dreams. (pardon the pun)

    #24 Posted: 17/6/2009 - 14:39

  • MADMAC

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    Khunwilko
    You are very knowledgeable on some areas, but bikes aren't your thing are they?

    There is no legal CC limit to a bike in Thailand. You can buy a brand new Harley here, made in the USA, with papers, completely legal. The Honda Phantom is made in Bangkok. The CC limit is a limit as to what kind of motorcycle you can drive without a motorcycle driving license. I have heard various reports of that limit being anywhere from 125 to 200 cc. I don't honestly think most of the cops know what the limit is - they certainly don't care.

    Why you "wouldn't be seen dead" on a fantom, but are willing to ride a Honda Wave, I don't know. The Phantom is a much safer, much better riding bike.

    Ground
    If your woman comes on the back, her ass is going to get pretty sore unless you get yourself a large cruising bike. In my opinion, she should either:

    a. Ride her own bike.
    b. Take the bus from place to place and meet you there.

    #25 Posted: 17/6/2009 - 17:04

  • grndhouse

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    thanks alot for the info.

    never riden a moped, just cruisers.
    are they automatic?

    #26 Posted: 18/6/2009 - 08:29

  • MADMAC

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    grndhouse
    The most common bikes around here - like the Honda Wave which is now everywhere (my wife drives one), have a gear shift by your left foot with four gears plus neutral and no clutch. You just push down (not up) for the next grear. It's not a smooth ride.

    The Fino is somewhat more expensive, but popular with the girl set. It is an automatic.

    As with cars, I much prefer bikes that have a clutch. This is because I can put the bike in neutral anytime I want without grearing down, which is a very useful feature. Also, within reason, power is a very useful thing in a bike. As I mentioned earlier, you need enough power to keep up with the flow of traffic on the highway. If people are passing you a lot, that's a recipe for trouble. And if you drive in the little motorcycle lane on the edge of the road - take it slow, because you have zero reaction time if something moves onto the road. You're too close to the edge.

    If you can't drive a standard transmission car, then learning to do so on a bike might be tough. If you can, then it will be easy. My son learned in 5 minutes, and he'd never driven a motorcycle in his life.

    #27 Posted: 18/6/2009 - 13:58

  • grndhouse

    Joined Travelfish
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    MADMAC-
    that response was great. thanks alot.
    really appreciate it.
    ill be teaching the girl how to use a clutch this month.

    #28 Posted: 23/6/2009 - 08:09

  • MADMAC

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    Let me know how the trip goes. Gave fun. If you're in Mukdahan (where I live) drop me a line.

    #29 Posted: 23/6/2009 - 18:15

  • mitchell

    Joined Travelfish
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    just go man. dont worry about what may happen. if you can ride a bike you can ride a bike. the roads here are great. you must return the bike to the place you got it.
    the problem now is that you will encounter lots of rain. be prepared.
    the best guidebook is by david unkovich. written only for bikers in northern thailand. really, i think it may be the best guidebook ever for bikers.
    i rode for 3 months in 2003 throughout the north. spectacular. the area around nan and north of there is superb. over to mae hong son and down the west side. a ride up to doi inthanon, thailand's highest peak is quite beautiful too.
    a honda125cc will do fine. i had one up to 110kph here in kanchanaburi over the last 3 days. fully automatic. squeeze and go!
    this is after just coming over from india where i was on my bullet for 8 months in the northeast.
    you will enjoy it. just come.

    #30 Posted: 27/6/2009 - 15:35

  • keebone

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    25th June, 2009
    Posts: 10

    If you want a great ride around the Chiang Mai area then The Mae Hong Son Loop is probably the one to go for. I did it a few years back with the Girlfriend on a Honda Bros over 3 days/2 nights leaving from Chiang Mai, overnighting in Mae Sariang first night and Pai second night. This wasn't really enough time and if I did it again I'd take at least 5 days/4 nights, stop at Mae Hong Son and throw in some more exploration off the 2 highways that make up the loop. It's certainly not for the faint hearted, there's literally thousands of hairpin bends and your constantly going up and down mountains. By the time we was back in Chiang Mai my wrists were just about ready for amputation having to take the weight of the 2 of us whilst braking down the steep mountain roads but it's one of the top 5 highlights of my times in Thailand.

    #31 Posted: 28/6/2009 - 12:59

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    mitchell

    A Honda 125cc is fine, except...

    I rented one in Chiang Mai earlier this year. Went to Doi Inthanon on the first day and when travelling at 100k++ the spark plug blew out of the housing (back near CM). Fortunately I could return it (used some duct tape to hold it in place!!!), and swapped for another. This time I took a Yamaha. It went OK for a while, but the brakes were shot. So I took it back and got another Honda - this time a 130cc and this time relatively new.

    Moral of the story... If you are going to rent a small bike, make sure it isn't too old (and hence thrashed).

    Cheers

    #32 Posted: 28/6/2009 - 20:32

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    UInfortunately the law and what actually goes on in Thailand are 2 seperate things Im well aware of the existance of the "I wouldn't-be-seen-dead-on-one" Phantom and Harleys - I think you might benefit from looking into the law as it stands and in relationship to these machines.
    Te reality is that apaet of these models you'll notice a complete lack of the usual superbikes......this is not just for tax reasons.

    #33 Posted: 29/6/2009 - 08:55

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6333
    Total reviews: 10

    Khunwilko
    "UInfortunately the law and what actually goes on in Thailand are 2 seperate things Im well aware of the existance of the "I wouldn't-be-seen-dead-on-one" Phantom and Harleys - I think you might benefit from looking into the law as it stands and in relationship to these machines.
    Te reality is that apaet of these models you'll notice a complete lack of the usual superbikes......this is not just for tax reasons."

    Again, I do not believe there is a Thai law prohibiting the size of the engine on a bike. Sorry, I'm sure you are mistaken. If there was, you would not be able to register said bike, and even if you could, it would cost you under the table. I own chopper, it is legally registered, and I didn't pay a bribe to get it registered. So even if there were such a law (and there isn't) it wouldn't matter because it is not being enforced anywhere in Thailand.

    But in any case, I challenge you to substantiate the claim, because I am sure it is wrong. There is a motorcycle club here in Muk where I live, and the members have all sorts of bikes, and none of them have motors of less than 400cc. In fact, an acquaintance of mine just sold a 1,200cc Honda (thing was a monster - too heavy in my view. His too which was why he was selling it). It had papers - he didn't pay a bribe to get them.

    Come on, if this were illegal, you would have to be paying some under the table money to get your registration. On top of that, such a law would make no sense in motorcycle crazy Thailand. You can own a Mercedes but you can't own a Harley? What would be the purpose of such a law?

    #34 Posted: 29/6/2009 - 18:47

  • brianennion

    Joined Travelfish
    29th January, 2009
    Posts: 4
    Total reviews: 2

    Madmac,
    I agree with you 100%. There is no law against these "Super Bikes". It is just a niche market.

    I was in the Kawasaki Show room over at Din Deang the other week. Looking at the Ninja 250. They had Bikes up to 1 litre available.

    All legit, no dodgy stuff. If they were not legit.. How would you get insurnace on them (1st Class).. It clearly states what the bike is and the CC size etc..

    http://www.kawasaki.co.th/

    #35 Posted: 29/6/2009 - 22:01

  • mitchell

    Joined Travelfish
    26th June, 2009
    Posts: 16
    Total reviews: 2

    hey bruce. sounds like a real trip! i cant imagine a plug bolting out of place!! on my way from the west up to doi inthanon i misjudged hairpin turn #297 (!), went too wide, hit the sand and took it down. the bike flipped sideways, i did a somersault flip and landed right next to the bike on my feet in a crouch position! what luck. not a scratch on me.the rear brake pedal was bent back all the way so i had to go the rest of the way up to the mountain with only the front brakes. timidly as this was my first ever bike accident and down again to whatever small town is there where i stayed for the night. the next day some 15 year old kid welded the lever and it was as good as new for the rest of the trip.
    and yes, get a new bike. mine had only about 300 kms on it when i took it so i guess i was lucky. that bike took me everywhere i wanted to go.
    enjoy

    #36 Posted: 30/6/2009 - 18:15

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