Flag of Thailand

Thailand forum

Backpack Suggestions

  • Drew84

    Joined Travelfish
    6th July, 2011
    Posts: 36

    Hey guys and gals, planning a trip for mid aug for a month to Thailand and surrounding area and looking for a nice light backpack for the journey! I'm on a budget (arent we all) and have a couple in mind... lookin for opinions and possible alternatives. I'm a mid 20's male planning to pack light....

    Option #1 - Osprey Talon 44 - $130
    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___65587

    Option #2 - Lowe Alpine Zepton 50
    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___67316

    Thanks in advance guys!!

    #1 Posted: 6/7/2011 - 09:59

  • Advertisement

  • lissie45

    Joined Travelfish
    7th April, 2011
    Location New Zealand
    Posts: 18

    neither. They are top-loading which is awkward - and more importantly you can lock it - you need a travel style pack which allows you to lock the zips together - at least for international travel.

    If you are going light i'd seriously look at something that is carry-on size - but you may struggle to find something that fits well if you are tall.

    #2 Posted: 8/7/2011 - 06:00

  • sirhalberd

    Joined Travelfish
    30th December, 2007
    Posts: 295

    Believe it or not that millions of tourists still use suitcases too!

    Maybe you ought to consider a duffle bag. A duffle bag can be locked and many backpacks can not. When you check the bag in unsnap the carry strap and stick it inside so it doesn't get tangled up. (Some tourists stick backpacks in a sack so the straps don't get ripped off.)

    http://www.google.com/search?q=leather+-+canvas+duffle+bag&hl=en&tbs=shop%3A1&aq=f

    I know it is a lot sexier to say you were "backpacking" instead if "dufflebagging!"

    You will rarely walk long distances with a pack on anyway unless you go out of your way to select an overnight trek. Most tourists go from airport to taxi, bus or train and leave big bags in their hotel rooms! Then if they have a bag at all with them walking around it is a smaller carry bag.

    #3 Posted: 13/7/2011 - 10:45

  • Tennouji

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd September, 2007
    Location Japan
    Posts: 113
    Total reviews: 20

    Sirhalberd, "dufflebagging" sounds totally rock'n'roll. Keep up that fine tradtion.

    Why don't you get your gear together first and then see how many litres you really need.

    Of course, it depends on how much moving around you are doing, but if you are intending to take only a few shirts, pairs of shorts and wash them yourself overnight, you might not need such a big pack.

    I find 26 litres is adequate for a month in a tropical climate and I'm female!

    You don't need to take whole bottles of shampoo, shower gel etc for only a month, just dispense into smaller bottles. How often will you need socks? Probably not often - one pair will do! If you are going to be on the beach, you'll be in swimming shorts and sandals for most of the day, two or three T-shirts should be enough.

    You don't need to fuss over whether your bag is top or side loading if you pack lightly, but you should definitely fnd one that you can padlock. Check the zipper hole size as some are too small for a padlock to thread though.

    Small packs make getting on and off buses and ferries that much easier plus there is the smugness factor as you watch other red and sweaty tourists with their 80 litre packs!

    #4 Posted: 15/7/2011 - 11:33

  • helfet

    Joined Travelfish
    16th July, 2011
    Posts: 4

    I bought an Osprey called 'Aura'. It's a woman's bag but perhaps there's something similar for men. Love it! The bag is 50 litres, and by the end of every trip I take it's totally full! I could never subsist on 26 litres. Ha!

    Paid a bit more than I had originally planned/budgeted for my backpack, but it was totally worth it because I use it often. If you think you'll use this bag again, and you can afford it, I'd say it's definitely worth getting an decent bag that will last.

    It looks to me like that Osprey you linked to might have a zip on the bottom as well.
    I found having two zips on either end of the bag EXTREMELY helpful, but I think it's down to personal preference.

    If you can go to try these packs on, definitely do that, because you'll get a sense of which is more comfortable. My bag fits me perfectly, and the cushioned straps are a MAHOOSIVE huge benefit to have if you're stuck wearing it for longer than expected.

    Brought full sized containers of things like sunscreen and mosquito repellant. They're both expensive to buy in Thailand, particularly sunscreen so worth bringing with.

    I bring a waterproof-ish laundry bag with me to cover it/protect straps on airplanes etc, and the bag is still in perfect condition.

    #5 Posted: 16/7/2011 - 17:19

  • catoni52

    Joined Travelfish
    14th July, 2011
    Posts: 1

    Many good choices out there from several well known companies, but you might like the MEI Voyageur. It is maximum permitted carry-on size of 22×14×9 inches (56×36×23cm), made of 1000 denier Cordura with an interior urethane coating, and has a parallel stay internal aluminum frame. True backpack-style suspension system, one that incorporates internal stays (for vertical support) and a padded hip belt to take most of the load off your shoulders and on to your hips where it should be. Compression straps inside and outside. You might want to buy a couple extra 1" sliders at your local outdoors store to take up the exta strapping on the outside compression straps.
    The backpack suspension system zips away inside when not needed or for going on the plane, and you can carry it by its handle or a shoulder strap if you prefer. I ordered one and it cost me $175.00 Canadian to pay for it and get it shipped to Canada from where they are hand made in California. $136.00 if you live in the U.S. Heavy duty YKK zippers with lockable zipper hasps.
    You need to use packing cubes with this bag, as it is only two compartments. One big main compartment, and a outside zipper compartment. If you are a light weight one bagger traveler, and can travel with only a maximum size carry on, this might be for you. I love mine. Got it in coffe brown color. Great for Southeast Asia and almost anywhere else. Only problem is you need to order about three or four weeks before you go, because they are each individually hand made. Like they have been since the 1970's. But sometimes they have a few extras in stock for the person in a hurry. However you may not get the color you desire if you want one shipped right away.
    I'm 60 years old now, and still refuse to use a rolling bag.
    Recommended by onebag.com and one bag one world.
    MEI products are also warranted for the life of the purchaser.
    http://www.meipacks.com/index.html
    http://www.1bag1world.com/blog/2007/8/30/mei-voyageur-travelpack-review.html
    http://www.onebag.com/leisure-bags.html

    #6 Posted: 17/7/2011 - 10:51

Have questions? Jump to our menu of forum quicklinks

Add your reply

Your reply

Check this box if you want to be notified of replies.

Please be familiar with our user guidelines before you post. Thanks!

Businesses planning on plugging their guesthouse / hotel / karaoke bar should read our "Addition guidelines" very carefully.

You need to be logged in to answer an existing post on the Travelfish forums. Please login via the prompts just above and refresh this screen -- before writing your post -- and you'll be in business.