Flag of Thailand

Thailand forum

Tentative Thai Traveller

  • Canudigit

    Joined Travelfish
    17th November, 2008
    Posts: 13

    Hello Fellow Thai Travellers,
    I am a first timer to Asia and thought Thailand would be 'Asia Light'.
    I leave Jan. 5 for two months, and have applied for the 60 day Thai tourist visa from the embassy in Ottawa. (Am Canadian)
    Am also a little scared. If you can answer the following, from your experience, would appreciate it.
    1) What is the best wary to carry money - I heard they charge for each traveller's cheque cashed, and that the bank machine fees are also high.
    2) Any chance of getting a deal in a guest house on an Island - is tourism suffering from the economic crisis?
    3) What 3 things should I for sure take along in my 5 pound backpack, which is also my only carry on luggage?
    Thanks, travellers.

    #1 Posted: 17/11/2008 - 10:41

  • Advertisement

  • Thaiman

    Click here to learn more about Thaiman
    Joined Travelfish
    12th November, 2008
    Posts: 201

    Traveller's cheques are a good safe way to carry money but,yes,you get charged.Bankcards are also a good way but you also get charged .ATMs are everywhere.Never worked out the cheapest way,I just accept you got to pay.The more you take out the cheaper it is but there is the obvious risk with that.Can't really answer the second one but probably a bit.As for the third one,and I'm serious about this,carry some toilet tissue with you.[Can buy locally]You never know when you might need it and a lot of convienences,especially outside of tourist areas,don't have it.I always carry some in the wallet.

    #2 Posted: 17/11/2008 - 14:53

  • Canudigit

    Joined Travelfish
    17th November, 2008
    Posts: 13

    Thanks Thaiman.
    Funny, first thing I did in July, before buying air ticket, was obtain an industrial size roll of TP and pop it into the backpack.
    Thanks for tips - hope I survive Thailand.

    #3 Posted: 17/11/2008 - 22:07

  • shakester

    Joined Travelfish
    5th September, 2006
    Posts: 37
    Total reviews: 4

    survive? am sure you will have a wonderful time!

    enjoy.

    #4 Posted: 17/11/2008 - 22:30

  • ChangFai

    Click here to learn more about ChangFai
    Joined Travelfish
    10th April, 2007
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 139

    Canudigit
    You will pay a 33baht fee when cashing travellers cheques . That is PER Cheque , so dont get small value cheques .

    Remember you do get a better exchange rate for Travellers Cheques than cash .

    I can buy them in the UK at 0% commission ,so along with the security cheques give you , they are my preferred way of fundings my trips .

    #5 Posted: 18/11/2008 - 10:45

  • Rufus

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd April, 2007
    Location Laos
    Posts: 950

    Travellers cheques are very old technology, usually used nowadays by infrequent travellers. Use a debit card. Deiting on the country you are from the rates vary and you can even get some that have no charges for withdrawals.

    #6 Posted: 18/11/2008 - 18:10

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    ATMs are sooo convenient, bring your cards and let the bank know!!!! r else they may stop them. You can use them in banks ATMs Exchange booths, shops, supermarkets, gas stations etc etc...why carry money? They are also available 24/7.
    you get a better rate of exchange in Thailand than at home so work out that against your fees.

    Here' a check list for Thailand....


    Here are 20 things to think about when visiting Thailand…

    1. Bring a cell phone “unblocked” and buy a Thai SIM card for it on arrival, they’re cheap (apprx. 50 baht) and include some credit already on them - e.g. - International calls to UK are about 5 - 8baht per min…Phones are cheap too – and unblocked

    2. Money - Bring ATM and/or credit cards. - check fees and tell your bank your are going abroad. - Take Travellers cheques only as back-up. Bring very little cash (Baht) – you tend to get a better rate of exchange here than any home country. You can change money on arriving at the airport...

    3. Booking – there is usually no need to book rooms before you come as there is plenty of cheap accommodation. Exceptions would be in high season if you want a particular place and maybe for your first one or two nights just to get orientated.

    4. Bring very few clothes – they are cheap here and you’ll only bring stuff that is too warm anyway.

    5. Very little luggage – this makes you more mobile if you need to be and less vulnerable to taxi touts and undesirable men….Before you go home you can buy any extra luggage (cheap) to take souvenirs etc.

    6. Internet access is everywhere – even on the beach… you can get all your photos copied to CD - If you have a lap-top you can connect it (broadband even wi-fi) at most cafes.

    7. Food - Thai food is very unlikely to give you food poisoning but can contain more chillies than you ever thought possible….Street food is usually safe (and delicious!), check for numbers of customers and general looks of the stall. Western (“farang”) food is much more likely to give you food poisoning – fridges are not part of Thai cooking lore yet…beware of Western Fast Food outlets and hotel buffets - food that has been out for over an hour or so. Thailand is not used to fridges/chill-serve etc.

    8. Always carry a pack of tissues - they don’t supply free tissues (if there is a vending machine at all!)

    9. Drink bottled water - not tap water. Even consider not brushing your teeth with tap water. Ice is usually safe in drinks and for anything else.

    10. Use common safety sense – it is easy to relax too much here…when it comes to petty crime the rate is certainly lower than in places like the US/Europe etc…but every country has its share of con-men and psychopaths…..beware of fellow travellers!

    11. Don’t be afraid to go to Pattaya – it is the sex capital of Thailand but they don’t jump out at single women and couples and it has good, cheap hotels, shopping and food. Not a bad place to start off for Koh Chang, Koh Samet or Cambodia.

    12. Bring an international driving licence – although most national ones are accepted by motorbike and car hire companies and anyone else who wants to hire you something….you may not be insured without an IDL! In Thailand they drive on the left - cars are Right-hand-drive. However driving is really only for the experienced. Be especially careful on a motorbike - Samui has the highest accident rate in Thailand.

    13. Public transport is cheap. Planes, Trains, Buses, Minibuses, Taxis, from town to town. If you’re in a minibus or taxi, tell the driver you’ll tip him if he keeps the speed below 90/100 kmph! National speed limit is 90kph (120 on motorways)

    14. Around Bkk try to use meter taxis with the meter on...it’ll be cheaper than the tuk-tuks. Take a tuk-tuk once for the experience then use meter taxis. Don’t let the drivers take you out of your way...they’ll try to take you to some (relative’s) store where they get commission.

    15. Medical - Check out a few “jabs & medications” - Hep “A” & “B” require a long course before leaving and are a pretty good idea – don’t bother with the malaria ones – too heavy! You can get tetanus or rabies here if you’re bitten by a dog - it’s cheap. Most medicines (including antibiotics) can be bought over the counter without prescription and are cheap. A pharmacist will give you what he considers right for your symptoms but you can just as easily see a doctor at a local clinic for a couple of hundred baht. They usually speak a little English.

    16. Check up on Thai manners and customs – this will earn you more respect from the locals. - Keep up some dress sense – how you dress in Thailand is quite important. Don’t go topless without checking out if it’s acceptable where you are – usually it’s frowned upon. You’ll notice that Thai women (even sex workers) are very modest in public –they usually swim fully clothed. Table manners – Thais tend to eat from communal dishes in the centre of the table – don’t pour everything onto your own plate!

    17. Don’t knock the royal family – even in jest.

    18. Body language - Don’t point your feet at people – the body is seen as hierarchical and the feet are the lowest part and should not be waved about (this is like a “fingers up” sign. Before entering someone’s home you must take off your shoes; this also applies to some shops and businesses. - Never take a shoe off and wave it at someone – this could lead to violence.
    On the other hand it is impolite to touch people on the head.

    19. It’s not necessary to “Wai” people - the Thai greeting - as you’ll probably get it wrong. If they Wai you, you might try a wai back.

    20. Remember, this is the Land of Smiles and you will find everything goes much better when you have a smile on your face - whatever the situation….

    #7 Posted: 18/11/2008 - 21:27

  • Canudigit

    Joined Travelfish
    17th November, 2008
    Posts: 13

    Just started this research and already I'm getting that deja vu sense of having already read the long post by khunwilco somewhere...
    My bank says $5 charge each time I use an ATM in the Kingdom. Thanks for the 33baht charge info ChaingFai-will be taking some to lessen impact of $5 ATM charges.
    A girl who'd been to the islands advised me to take a sleep sack for roughing it. She also said, in disgust, that "you know, the Islands are full of drunk British guys", to which I replied, I was hoping for Australians!

    #8 Posted: 18/11/2008 - 21:45

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    I can think of several reasons for not roughing it. Lying on the ground/beach with mozzies,sand flies and whatever else for a start. Then theres the vulnerability of it...unless there's a group of you. It's not a common thing to do in Thailand.

    A full size sleeping bag would be too hot most of the time and a waste of space...a liner might be your solution. Personally if I was sleeping out a lot, I'd wait till I got here and look around, maybe buy a mozzie net or one of those "pop-up" mozzie-screen tents available in all the supermarkets!.

    #9 Posted: 19/11/2008 - 05:22

  • ChangFai

    Click here to learn more about ChangFai
    Joined Travelfish
    10th April, 2007
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 139

    Rufus
    T.C.'s might be old technology to you , but they work fine for me thank you very much .

    Unlike my mate who only used a Nationwide debit card while travelling in Thailand .

    The card got cloned and was used throughout Europe , even though he only used the card to withdraw money from Thai bank ATMs .

    #10 Posted: 19/11/2008 - 16:46

  • Advertisement

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Card are no more - or less - at risk in Thailand than your home country, one needs to take the usual precautions. I accidentally put my card through a skimmer that had been attached to the ATM machine in a petrol station. I now look a lot more carefully at the machine before inserting my card....in any country.
    As for TTs, I've witnessed my friend have his TT refused at a booth, either too large or wrong bank or currency...it wasn't clear why.He said it wasn't the first time either. Maybe they just couldn't be bothered!
    I got really fed up that every time he needed cash we had to troop off to some booth to change his money....every time you want money you have to go to a booth or bank and this means finding one and it has to be in their opening hours and the fixed amount on the cheques. so although they are safe, they can be a hassle at times too. For shear convenience it's a card every time.

    #11 Posted: 19/11/2008 - 17:43

  • ChangFai

    Click here to learn more about ChangFai
    Joined Travelfish
    10th April, 2007
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 139

    Khunwilko , how many threads have we debated this point on ;-)

    Personally I have never had a problem cashing a T.C. , and they all seem to be American Express £ travellers cheques that the UK banks deal with nowadays.

    I will say , be careful signing them when you receive them , try and make sure that your signatature is the same as your passport one , as that is the first thing they look at .

    I probably cash a cheque every 10 days or so , where my friends will take small amounts from ATM's , meaning that they make more trips for money than I do .

    For security purposes , old technology works this time .

    #12 Posted: 19/11/2008 - 18:44

  • Tilapia

    Click here to learn more about Tilapia
    Joined Travelfish
    21st April, 2006
    Location Canada
    Posts: 1421
    Total reviews: 15
    Places visited:
    At least 71

    Another way you could deal with your money is to bulk up your credit card just before you leave, and then take cash advances as you go. No fees, and you'll get a better exchange rate. The only problem with this is that you may not always find a bank open when you need one. So, take a few TCs and your bank card. Use the bank card for emergencies, and TCs in places where there's no ATM. Some folks there will take your TCs, but at a horrible exchange rate (like on islands where there are no ATMs ... yes, there are still a couple). Just take small TC notes. And definitely take TCs (but more U$) if you plan on going to Laos.

    Bring a liner if you want, but I find that a sarong does the trick. It's going to be hot when you're there. Or get a silk one made when you're in Thailand.

    And you don't need to bring your own toilet paper. You can get it there all over the place. Carry it with you, though, even when you are going out for dinner. You never know, and those squatters aren't always stocked. In fact, they're almost never stocked.

    Three of the things at the top of my list to take are sunscreen (and lots of it), my own shampoo, and traveler's clock. Also a good paperback book, sunglasses, hat, bandana, and a small roll-up hammock (bought in Trat.)

    If you want, ask Somtam to give you my e-mail address. I may be visiting my sister in Ottawa before you leave. We might be able to hook-up.

    Somtam, if he wants it, go and head and send it to him. Thanks.

    Cheers

    #13 Posted: 19/11/2008 - 19:47

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    So security = carrying round 10 days of money?

    Above has reminded me that some banks now issue travellers" cards.....I think they work like a bulked up credit card, except they're probably debit cards...i think they're available in Oz...elsewhere, you'd have to ask.

    #14 Posted: 19/11/2008 - 19:56

  • exacto

    Joined Travelfish
    12th February, 2006
    Location United States
    Posts: 2357
    Total reviews: 47
    Places visited:
    At least 98

    i've been sold on the virtues of an ATM/bank card for getting local currency ever since this one time we crossed the border into switzerland late on a sunday evening. there was no hope of exchanging a travellers check at that time of day/week, and we really had to have swiss francs to pay for our campsite and food. the ATM option saved our butts.

    having said that, we usually travel with 80 percent of our funds in our checking account, accessible by ATM, 10 percent in travellers checks, and 10 percent in cash. that combination has worked for me in over two dozen countries over the last several decades.

    now, having said that, i've also learned from reading the many posts on the subject that how you handle your money on the road is a very personal choice, and whatever you do that works for you is great since it works for you.

    the silk sleep sacks that people recommend in this thread are also great to have on the road. they take up almost zero space in your pack, and go a long way towards making even an iffy place into a comfy night's sleep. we bought some higher end silk sleep sack made in new zealand, and thought they were worth the extra money.

    also, we've always thought that the little packs of tissues you can get at the counter at any 7-11 in thailand were great to have on the road. cheap and versatile for use as TP, etc. we also usually carry a small, travel-sized pack of wet ones wipes (baby wipes) for all kinds of clean up while travelling.

    finally, i think that wilko's checklist of 20 things for thailand is one of the best bits of advice you'll ever get for free.

    hope that helps. regards.

    #15 Posted: 20/11/2008 - 11:53

  • Rufus

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd April, 2007
    Location Laos
    Posts: 950

    Totally agree with Khunwilko on this. I know of people who have had Travellers' cheques refused as well. Why on earth would you bother? The travellers' card mentioned above is a good one. I haven't used this stone age technology in over 15 years of international travel now. As I said, its usually first time travellers who use them.

    #16 Posted: 20/11/2008 - 11:58

  • exacto

    Joined Travelfish
    12th February, 2006
    Location United States
    Posts: 2357
    Total reviews: 47
    Places visited:
    At least 98

    i also think it is wise to have some sort of back-up means of getting local currency. on one trip to mexico the ATM network was out of service for two days. fortunately, we had a few travellers checks with us that we could exchange. of course, it doesn't need to be travellers checks, since cash would have worked just as well (and the lower rates you get in some places still outpace the fees of TCs). if you are comfortable with it, keeping a few days supply of local currency on you is also a good back up plan. cheers.

    #17 Posted: 20/11/2008 - 23:29

  • Jon_Mak_Mak

    Click here to learn more about Jon_Mak_Mak
    Joined Travelfish
    21st February, 2007
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 464
    Total reviews: 5

    Just thought I'd add my 2 pennies to this.

    I NEVER get Bhat in UK. Get it in Thailand. I would take travallers cheques and also a Natiowide cash card.

    Natiowide doesn't charge so thats cool. BUT, they tell you that if the money isnt in their you cant take it out. = complete bollox. My wife and I went abpout £300 overdrawn while in Thailand last! :(

    Anyway, My opinion is not to take cash but take some travellers cheaque or a bank card.

    #18 Posted: 26/11/2008 - 17:03

  • Crom

    Joined Travelfish
    26th November, 2008
    Posts: 4

    Hi guys, I'm heading to Thailand in late December for New Year and then 3-6 months trekking about the region. I'm going to take a credit card, a Maestro/Switch card and some traveller's cheques.

    Does it make any difference what currency the TCs are in? By default I'd get UK pounds but if US dollars are more accepted then I can get those.

    Also, one other recommendation is to take along "dry wash". It's a tube of sanitizing gel to clean your hands. Very useful.

    Cheers all, Crom

    #19 Posted: 26/11/2008 - 22:07

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    The more you change your money the more you'll lose in fees and rates of exchange. I guess if I was to buy in any currency other than my native I'd look at euros or dollars and then maybe think which will increase most in value whilst sitting in my wallet as travellers cheques. As for the pound....well has that hit rock-bottom yet?
    CARDS - take your debit / ATM card - Visa or Cirrus-Maestro as well as a credit card. Check your banks fees and LET THEM KNOW you are going to use them abroad

    #20 Posted: 27/11/2008 - 08:02

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    It's probably sterling that is most likely to be refused by a changer....especially if it continues to lose value - who wants to buy money that is losing value?

    #21 Posted: 27/11/2008 - 08:04

  • Jon_Mak_Mak

    Click here to learn more about Jon_Mak_Mak
    Joined Travelfish
    21st February, 2007
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 464
    Total reviews: 5

    " #20 Posted: 27/11/2008 - 08:02


    The more you change your money the more you'll lose in fees and rates of exchange. I guess if I was to buy in any currency other than my native I'd look at euros or dollars and then maybe think which will increase most in value whilst sitting in my wallet as travellers cheques. As for the pound....well has that hit rock-bottom yet?
    CARDS - take your debit / ATM card - Visa or Cirrus-Maestro as well as a credit card. Check your banks fees and LET THEM KNOW you are going to use them abroad"

    Ah! This is VERY important! LET YOUR BANK KNOW. (but..)

    My mum tried to get cash out in Phuket and it was an emergency. My dad was in the hospital (in Phuket) but our hotel was in Krabi. We were all in phuket with my dad and needed to get back to krabi and had NO money. We tried my mums Llyods ccash ard in several cash machines and altho the pin worked and we new she had more than enough funds we got NO money at all - It was a nightmare! (I will tell the full story of this soon)

    Anyway, when we got back to England my mum had a few messages from the bank saying that the card was being used in Thailand. My mum was furious as SHE DID LET THE BANK KNOW before that she was travelling!

    Moral of the story? I guess its to have as many options as possible. (cash/cheque/card)

    :)

    #22 Posted: 27/11/2008 - 16:37

  • Crom

    Joined Travelfish
    26th November, 2008
    Posts: 4

    Yep, just to reiterate that good point made by Jon_Mak_Mak: Although it is a good idea to tell your bank that you're going abroad (anywhere, not just somewhere far away) it won't make a blind bit of difference to their actions. I had this in the states earlier this year and Cuba last year. The customer service people can leave whatever notes they like on your account but the security system is automatic. They WILL stop your card. The only thing that you can do to protect yourself is to make sure that you have EVERY international (not one of those expensive 0870's) number for your banks and CC provider on your mob (and printed in your bag, in case mob gets nicked) and expect to call them a day or so into your trip.

    Interesting that you think sterling will be refused. I'll probably take dollars then...but as someone said, we lose everytime we change currency.

    Crom

    #23 Posted: 27/11/2008 - 19:40

  • Enigma

    Joined Travelfish
    14th September, 2008
    Posts: 20

    All this talk about money and its various forms makes my head spin. To each his own.

    All transactions come with a fee, to one extent or another. You take cash out of your bank account via a local ATM and the bank charges you an ATM fee. You buy Travelers Checks (T/C) and you pay a fee. (Insurance really.) You cash the T/C (or exchange cash for foreign exchange (FX) and you pay a fee, hidden in the exchange rate.

    For me, I always have a little cash - usually USD - but EUR or GBP work fine all over Thailand. I tend to use that cash only in an emergency - such as when I can't find an ATM that will accept my card, the bank locks the card for some fraud protection reason, my card gets lost or damaged, etc.

    I use ATM's almost exclusively for my travel cash. I find that when I compare the ATM transactions and the ATM fee against the cash FX transactions or compare against the cost of buying and selling T/C's the end results are about the same. For me the ATM's are more convenient. I would even pay extra for that convenience.

    I make sure my banks know that I travel extensively and I alert them in advance when I am going outside of my normal travel patterns. I do this for both the ATM card and the credit cards I carry.

    Remember that an ATM card is different from a credit card. It gets expensive if you are taking cash advances from a Visa or Master Card, as you pay transaction fees and interest.

    That's what I do. But again, to each his own. It's your money!

    If the political situation in Thailand deteriorates much more, you will all want to have a ton of good old US Dollars (or perhaps gold) to help bribe yourself onto a fast fishing boat heading out of the country. (Kidding, of course.)

    #24 Posted: 28/11/2008 - 01:16

  • Canudigit

    Joined Travelfish
    17th November, 2008
    Posts: 13

    Loads of great info here.
    Quick question to Thai experts.
    Taking Canadian dollars - cash - to Thailand to exchange. Good idea? Accepted? Hard to change?

    #25 Posted: 4/12/2008 - 09:36

  • fondo

    Joined Travelfish
    23rd June, 2006
    Posts: 158
    Total reviews: 19
    Places visited:
    At least 98

    Well, here's one advantage of TCs. I bought my holiday money in USD TCs and cash when the AUD was worth USD0.95. when I went up to SEA it was changing at about USD0.64.

    For that, I can live with stone age technology.

    #26 Posted: 4/12/2008 - 16:50

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    fondo - theres nothing to stop the reverse of that happening either.

    #27 Posted: 4/12/2008 - 22:41

  • joma416

    Joined Travelfish
    5th December, 2008
    Posts: 1

    OP, since you are from Canada, you may want to consider opening up a savings or checking account with Citizen's Bank. They offer a few 'global' accounts where they waive international transaction fees for a certain number of transactions per month. You will still pay some fees for your ATM withdrawls, but the other half of the fee will be waived.

    I am (hopefully) going next week and I will be using my savings account from them while I'm there. I'll check my account afterwards and let you know what kind of fees I had to pay.

    Also, I went last year and was able to use my TD Bank and President's Choice ATM cards in Thailand no problem. Japan was another story though, and was glad that I had a few traveler's cheques to hold me over.

    #28 Posted: 5/12/2008 - 06:49

  • fondo

    Joined Travelfish
    23rd June, 2006
    Posts: 158
    Total reviews: 19
    Places visited:
    At least 98

    Thanks for pointing that out khun ... never crossed my mind.

    #29 Posted: 5/12/2008 - 07:29

  • travelrock

    Joined Travelfish
    19th April, 2008
    Posts: 209
    Total reviews: 18

    "was obtain an industrial size roll of TP and pop it into the backpack."

    What the hell is tp?

    #30 Posted: 16/12/2008 - 09:35

  • exacto

    Joined Travelfish
    12th February, 2006
    Location United States
    Posts: 2357
    Total reviews: 47
    Places visited:
    At least 98

    toilet paper

    #31 Posted: 16/12/2008 - 10:42

  • travelrock

    Joined Travelfish
    19th April, 2008
    Posts: 209
    Total reviews: 18

    who the hell calls it tp?

    #32 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 00:42

  • travelrock

    Joined Travelfish
    19th April, 2008
    Posts: 209
    Total reviews: 18

    "It's probably sterling that is most likely to be refused by a changer....especially if it continues to lose value - who wants to buy money that is losing value?"

    ridiculous advice

    customer service reps are not in the business of currency speculation. they offer whatever daily rates are available.

    uk pounds are a major currency which will be accepted as well as anything

    #33 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 00:49

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    you mat get a nasty shock as the banks can simply issue intructions not to take sterling or don't keep any in stock

    #34 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 09:01

  • travelrock

    Joined Travelfish
    19th April, 2008
    Posts: 209
    Total reviews: 18

    Again ridiculous advice

    #35 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 09:32

  • ChangFai

    Click here to learn more about ChangFai
    Joined Travelfish
    10th April, 2007
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 139

    Khun Wilko
    I am surprised at you ALSO spouting alarmist nonsense .

    #36 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 09:55

  • DLuek

    TF writer
    Joined Travelfish
    19th June, 2008
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 871
    Total reviews: 14

    Well since everyone else is relaying their money management strategies, might as well...

    I go with about 15% of my total funds in U$ cash, which I don't really touch while in Thailand but do use in, say, Cambodia. Cash acts as emergency back-up too - just have to keep it secure.

    Then I have separate checking accounts (same bank) with two separate cards. The first one, which I use at ATMs in Thailand, usually has only around 25% of my total funds. When this gets low, I transfer funds from another account that holds the remaining 60%. The card for the "master account" is kept secure with the cash and doesn't get touched unless the first card is lost, stolen, rejected, etc. Finally, I do bring a credit card but it's really just for emergency.

    With this system, I feel nice and secure.

    Peace,

    DL

    #37 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 12:46

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    I believe when my friend had a TC refused it was because it was in sterling and the bank "didn't have any".

    #38 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 15:53

  • travelrock

    Joined Travelfish
    19th April, 2008
    Posts: 209
    Total reviews: 18

    didnt have any what?

    tcs get changed into baht.

    the pound is far stronger than the baht will ever be

    any decent bank will accept it

    #39 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 20:48

  • exacto

    Joined Travelfish
    12th February, 2006
    Location United States
    Posts: 2357
    Total reviews: 47
    Places visited:
    At least 98

    i don't think wilko is suggesting that the pound isn't a strong or desirable currency. from what i read, he is simply relaying his personal experience and witness of that currency being refused.

    for the record, the one and only time i ever saw money being refused by the exchange window at a bank in thailand also happened to be the pound.

    but that's anecdotal, and i suspect that if one place refuses a currency, the next place will happily take it.

    even so, it is fair comment for wilko to share that experience and issue a warning. that experience may be atypical, but doesn't make it any less real and certainly shouldn't get anyone worried. cheers.

    #40 Posted: 17/12/2008 - 23:11

  • travelrock

    Joined Travelfish
    19th April, 2008
    Posts: 209
    Total reviews: 18

    so they refused the pound but took the kip LOL

    No it's just bad advice.

    #41 Posted: 18/12/2008 - 08:05

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    TR - give it a rest mate, your comments about the baht seem to indicate that you don't fully understand what's going on -

    #42 Posted: 18/12/2008 - 09:37

  • ChangFai

    Click here to learn more about ChangFai
    Joined Travelfish
    10th April, 2007
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 139

    Khun Wilko
    I also "dont understand" .

    It was a reasonable question , in asking what they were trying to change a sterling TC into what they "didnt have" .

    I did have a chuckle yesterday , while cashing a Sterling TC , in a Siam City Bank in Pattaya .

    While counting my cash , the next customer was a Guy trying to get baht using his Visa credit card , and he was turned away with "we dont do" .

    #43 Posted: 18/12/2008 - 10:25

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Sorry mate, in that case, I don't think i can help you.

    you know the one about "my dog has 4 legs"???

    #44 Posted: 18/12/2008 - 12:48

Have questions? Jump to our menu of forum quicklinks

Add your reply

Your reply

Check this box if you want to be notified of replies.

Please be familiar with our user guidelines before you post. Thanks!

Businesses planning on plugging their guesthouse / hotel / karaoke bar should read our "Addition guidelines" very carefully.

You need to be logged in to answer an existing post on the Travelfish forums. Please login via the prompts just above and refresh this screen -- before writing your post -- and you'll be in business.