Flag of Thailand

Thailand forum

How much clothing to pack!

  • benhopes

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 14

    It is my first time I'm travelling to Thailand, Laos and Malaysia for 5 weeks. I'm not sure how much to pack!

    T Shirts - how many?
    Short sleeved shirts? I believe these are useful for when its warm.
    Cargo pants / Combats?
    Do shorts need to be below knee level!!

    Help :) Pleeease!!

    #1 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 01:26

  • Advertisement

  • Thaiman

    Click here to learn more about Thaiman
    Joined Travelfish
    12th November, 2008
    Posts: 201

    Hi Ben
    If I were you I'd just take the minimun.say 3-4 T shirts,couple of short-sleeved shirts,perhaps one pair of long trousers and 3 pairs of shorts.Shorts don't have to be below knee level but it is considered polite if they are longer and loose fitting.Clothing is cheap in Asia and if you need more it is a simple process to buy some at the department store or market.{cheaper at the market]Hope this helps.

    #2 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 04:49

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    Ben

    Take as little as possible - for two reasons.

    1/.

    Non-Asians dress like, well, non-Asians!!! The longer term traveller very quickly learns that dressing like a non-Asian means they are often the target of scammers, touts, etc. So, if you plan to buy clothes as needed when in Asia, (hopefully) you'll buy clothes that don't make you look like a newbie traveller.

    2/.

    Clothes in Asia can be very cheap. And, buying them there means you also have momento's to take home.

    So, I'd suggest 2 t-shirts, 1 pr of long pants, 2 pr shorts (longish & loose). A pair of good quality (preferably leather) sandals, 1 pr joggers (ie like Nike style), and a decent light weight raincoat/cape.

    Also, go look at:

    http://www.travelfish.org/board/post/travelgear/6441_traditional-backpack--vs--hybrid-pack

    Maybe also look at:

    http://www.travelfish.org/board/post/financemoney/6708_hiding-money

    Cheers

    #3 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 05:51

  • mikethediver

    Click here to learn more about mikethediver
    Joined Travelfish
    23rd March, 2008
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 205
    Total reviews: 3

    Hi,
    Personally I'd ditch the T shirts. I find cotton short sleeved shirts cooler, dry quickier, and can be worn for more than 1 day, unlike T shirts. Also, you can buy T shirt or two from anywhere on your travels.

    I'd take 2 pairs of trousers as if you caught in a downpour (very possible ) it's nice to have a spare to change into. I travel with 3 cotton short sleeve shirts, 1 long sleeve to protect in case of too much sun or mozzies, 2 trousers and 1 pair of shorts that I only wear near water!

    However, if this is your first trip, whatever you pack will be too much!!!!!!!!!
    Enjoy !
    Mike

    #4 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 10:15

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    Mike

    I also use poly/cotton short sleeved, 'tailored' type shirts. Same as you, T-shirts are a drag.

    But, I suspect Ben is 'into' t-shirts.

    Cheers

    #5 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 14:22

  • benhopes

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 14

    Thanks for the responses!

    Bruce Moon what do you mean by asian and non asian dress sense?

    Would a t shirt with the adidas logo be classed as non asian??

    #6 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 15:36

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    OK, I have a slightly different take on this. Let's start with what you plan to do.

    Are you hiking jungle trails with Charlie Cong, or are you going to be sitting on beaches and drinking beer at night with hot women? Clearly your attire will reflect you activities.

    A few dos and don'ts if I may:

    Don't:
    1. Wear goofy shorts, sandals with white sox and a tank top if you are going out to a bar, decent restaraunt or nightclub. You are not only embarrassing yourself, but also the rest of us.

    2. I don't recommend shorts or sandals if you plan to spend any time really moving through difficult terrain. They are cooler, but they offer very little (or no) protection from the elements - and southeast Asia has some nasty elements (those red fire ants being my personal enemy). I prefer jungle boots for hiking.

    3. Don't, contrary to Mike's advice, EVER wear any shirt for more than one day. Preferably you change shirts at least once - thus using two a day. Southeast Asia tends towards the hot and humid - humans in this environment tend toward the funky and thus hygiene is important. There is nothing worse than sitting on a hot bus for three or four hours next to a tourist who is wearing the same dirty shirt he was wearing the day before.

    Do:

    1. Bring at least one nice set of clothes and dress shoes if there's a possibility of you going some place nice. Again, you don't want to under-dress. The single biggest criticism I hear from my friends here is that "Falangs" don't dress well. When I was in Laos a Laotian woman asked me, when a white guy in tank top, dirty shorts and shower shoes was walking past "Why would someone who can afford the money to come here for vacation dress like that?" I didn't have a good answer.

    2. Buy local. As Bruce says, you can purchase some decent, and in some ways unique, clothes here for very little money.

    3. Wear deodorant and cologne. Different peoples have different body odors, and Thais notice ours (and not in a positive way). Thus liberal use of these two items will make you more of a social hit than if you don't use them. While you're at it, take at least two showers a day too.

    There's nothing wrong with t-shirts. They wear well, they're cheap, a lot of people here wear them all the time. But I also do prefer cotton - linen even more if you can find it. Lightweight cotton breathes well.

    Lastly, time of year does matter. Winter our here, running from late November to about early March, gets pretty cold (nights can get to around 6-7 degrees celcius). Different parts of Southeast Asia are different in this regard (it being a big geograghic area), but don't assume it's always going to be hot. Check before you leave to be on the safe side.

    #7 Posted: 5/7/2009 - 21:46

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    Ben

    I could ramble on. But, simply, non-Asians dress according to their fashion in their home country, and the fashion in Asia is different.

    The difference is not necessarily about clothing items (though it can be), it's more about attitude.

    I white t-shirt with an adidas logo is clearly a very western garment. In the US, or Australia, it will be fashioned for this market and be worn in a certain way. The same item can readily be seen in Asia. But, an Asian will wear it more loosely (ie larger size), probably it will be of a design that is some years old, and hence it looks different. Of course, for the Asian it won't be an adidas garment, it will be a copy. And, the copier will have made it longer (than the US original) for the Asian preference, and probably added extra embellishments (such as contrast colour neck and arm bands). Thus, the Asian example is just different, presents differently, and is worn differently.

    As an aside, while Asians do copy western clothe designs, they put their own twist on them. If you want to see where Asian design is going, head for Kuala Lumpur.

    As for the comments by John in #7, above, most I agree with. A couple I don't.

    I wear sturdy quality leather sandals when trekking (unless its wet & muddy, then I'll wear joggers). I also visit fancy places in the same sandals (but see about pants, below). I just wear sandals everywhere.

    I also wear long pants everywhere. Many years ago, when first in Asia, I tried to respect their culture by not exposing too much 'flesh'. So, I learned to wear light weight poly trousers. I also found that these are just as easily washed as shorts, and they form a protection against mossies, etc., at dusk.

    But, (younger) Asians wear jeans (in a way that's different to the US). So, being younger, you might like to entertain wearing jeans.

    As for 'dress clothes'. In principle I agree with John, but probably not for you. If you are planning on dining out at the Hilton (or similar) then yes. But, if yours is to be a more laid back journey, then most likely not.

    As for deodorant, again Asians choose different smelling products to westerners. Even some of the traditional brand names of the US are marketed in Asia (and readily available) but have a different smell! So, you can buy in Asia (and its cheaper than at home) and choose an aroma quite different to your choice at home.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers

    #8 Posted: 6/7/2009 - 07:01

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Bruce and I are pretty much see this the same. I don't like sandals for the reasons I've cited, and never wear them. But I know lots of people who do. Generally speaking (and this is also not an absolute) upper class Thais don't wear sandals, and those are the people I am mostly associating with. But I live here, so that changes your perspective a bit. Again, this really comes down to personal preference. As Bruce says, he likes them and wears them all the time.

    I also wear jeans fairly often (but certainly not daily).

    #9 Posted: 6/7/2009 - 17:12

  • Sparts

    Joined Travelfish
    5th June, 2009
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 165
    Places visited:
    At least 17

    Benhopes, I'm in Thailand now and have taken the following:

    1 pair of flip flops
    1 pair of Merrils sandals - they were/are fine for short hikes.
    4 pairs of shorts (2 hard wearing cargo style, 2 beachy)
    5 T- shirts
    3 shirts
    Little underwear - gets too hot so I tend to go without - personnal preference

    I'm geting by ok. You get sweaty quick so go through shirts like there is no tomorrow. Already made a visit to the laundry after only a week or so. They can be found everywhere.
    I'll disagree with another poster (MADMAC maybe) who recommended taking hiking boots - far too heavy, asgain that is my personal preference.
    I've been to Chiang Mai and did some short hikes with my Merrils - no problems but the weather was nice (ish).

    Have a great time!

    #10 Posted: 8/7/2009 - 12:40

  • Advertisement

  • amazon_blon-
    de

    Joined Travelfish
    20th December, 2008
    Posts: 116
    Total reviews: 9

    benhopes, i'm assuming you're a guy and a fairly standard size? I'm checking just because the considerations are very different if you're a woman and/or you're a large size (especially if you're large by north american standards). i'm a 6-foot tall woman and simply have to take a different approach to packing than the posters above. i cannot reliably buy clothing in asia, especially pants/shorts, and i cannot buy shoes if my life depended on it. when all my underwear disappeared in the laundry on my most recent trip, it was a full-out crisis.
    this doesn't sound like your situation, so i won't elaborate, but you do need to consider whether you fall outside the "average" or "normal" range, and have special packing needs.

    #11 Posted: 13/7/2009 - 06:07

  • Jleef

    Joined Travelfish
    6th July, 2009
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 36

    What about the travel-designed clothing versus "normal" clothing argument? I.e. stuff by companies like The North Face and Bergaus, which is made to be lightweight, non-creasing, quick drying, moisture wicking etc...

    My plan was to get a couple of outfit changes of this type of clothing, albeit at a higher price and the risk of looking like a backpacking nerd, but hopefully for the higher convenience too. Then I could buy anything else I might want locally. But is the stuff unnecessary in the first place?

    #12 Posted: 14/7/2009 - 19:19

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    Jleef

    The western designer labels are sort of, well, nerdish...

    Once you get to SE Asia, you'll see what I mean.

    cheers

    #13 Posted: 14/7/2009 - 19:29

  • scotty29

    Joined Travelfish
    15th February, 2009
    Posts: 13

    hi ben

    im just back from thailand ;-( being my 1st time i was a bit wary about what to take as ddef didnt want to be weighed down with bags! So i took with me 4 t-shirts and 4 pairs of shorts, a soap bag and 1 pair of mocasin shoes and a pair of sandals it was plenty! i stayed in patong beach, phi phi and Ao nang, they are touristy parts of the country and there is laundry in every other shop and if ya drop it in, in the morning you can pick it up in the evening and only costs about £1.50 and it ironed!!

    #14 Posted: 14/7/2009 - 19:35

  • jakethedog

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd November, 2008
    Posts: 20

    My wife and I are travelling to Thailand in Feb09 and were going to get a couple of columbia or ex officio T shirts that are quick drying, wicking, odor resistant etc, and the same with the underwear. Wash them in the sink and we will be good to go. Two pairs of cargo type pants with the removable legs kills two birds with one stone.

    Any comments will be appreciated.

    Thanks Dan

    P.S. not all of the travelclothing is nerdy. check the ex officio, north face or columbia sites

    #15 Posted: 15/7/2009 - 00:10

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    jakethedog

    You are correct "not all of the travelclothing is nerdy".

    Personally, I've seen some travelclothing that isn't nerdy. But, the eyes and attitude that I use to determine what is or is not 'nerdy' is subjective to my experiences.

    In the US, or Europe or Atralia, etc., the travelclothing worn by (usually affluent) westerners and purchased from NorthFace, Columbia, etc., looks great.

    In SE Asia, the same stuff looks so so nerdy.

    As I wrote above, its all about fashion and attitude.

    A secondary issue is that if you read the Travelfish pages, one constrant gripe is that tourists are the targets of touts, con merchants, etc.

    The quickest way to attract touts, con merchants, etc. is to wear NorthFace, Columbia, etc. clothing - it just shouts at the touts, con merchants, etc., that the wearer is an easy target.

    Cheers

    #16 Posted: 15/7/2009 - 07:04

  • amazon_blon-
    de

    Joined Travelfish
    20th December, 2008
    Posts: 116
    Total reviews: 9

    I'll play devil's advocate to Brucemoon (for a change) and chime in with a different view on technical travel clothing. I love it. Sorry if you think it looks nerdy, Brucemoon, but if you're going to be hiking/trekking/climbing/whatever there's nothing else like it. When we travelled recently, we both had two pairs of dark technical pants (mostly Prana which is a climbing brand and North Face) which stood up well to dirt and repeated wear and cleaning. Because they were dark, they didn't stand out too terribly much, and were basically the same style as a cotton pant of the same make. We mixed and matched technical shirts when exerting ourselves and more casual, locally bought stuff when relaxing.
    Although we may not look like locals, we're never going to look like locals. I'm a six-foot blond and my partner is obviously western as well. We'll never blend in.
    And many tourists just wear the 'tourist patter' that's sold on the street markets in SEA. That isn't any better at getting you to blend in, for the reasons that Brucemoon mentioned. It would be great if we could/would wear what the locals wear, but there's no way in hell that I'm going to be comfortable wearing jeans, heels, and a long-sleeved button up shirt in 36 C weather in Bangkok, which is what many local women wear. Or what about thigh high shorts with heels, which is soo common for local women? I'd look rediculous and inappropriate if I wore that too.
    So I find I simply can't wear what the locals wear in most places. And I settle for being comfortable and not looking shabby, which for me, involves some technical pants (one pair of which has zip off knee length shorts and I love to death).

    #17 Posted: 15/7/2009 - 09:36

  • Jleef

    Joined Travelfish
    6th July, 2009
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 36

    I can see both sides of the argument here, and I guess compromise is the best answer. Whilst wearing The North Face from head to toe is bound to single me out as scam-worthy, I am, after all, a 6'2 white man with size 11 feet, in SE Asia for the first time and on my own, so I think blending in is going to be a tall order even if I'm completely draped in local garments.

    I think what I'll be going for is a few technical items for travel convenience, blended with the odd locally bought stuff too. Luckily there's a few makes available here (i.e. Technicals, Peter Storm) that don't always see fit to have a logo brightly emblazoned across the front.

    #18 Posted: 15/7/2009 - 18:25

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "a 6'2 white man with size 11 feet, in SE Asia for the first time and on my own, so I think blending in is going to be a tall order even if I'm completely draped in local garments."

    Remember though, if you're a tourist it's worth keeping an element of doubt in the mind of those who want to take advantage of you. And they might think you are an expat residing here. They are a lot more difficult to get over on, because they know the local prices and standards.

    #19 Posted: 15/7/2009 - 19:44

  • BruceMoon

    Click here to learn more about BruceMoon
    Joined Travelfish
    27th December, 2008
    Location Australia
    Posts: 1941
    Total reviews: 6

    jleef

    John (MAC) has a good point. Just because you may be a tall bloke with monstrous sized feet, it doesn't necessarily mean you're a newbie yokel.

    His point reinforces my argument that wearing clothes that identify with the locals can be helpful.

    Northface, etc., doesn't quite cut it with locals.

    Cheers

    #20 Posted: 15/7/2009 - 21:08

  • softwaretai-
    lor

    Joined Travelfish
    21st September, 2010
    Posts: 1

    I just wanted to take a moment to write and tell you how much we appreciate Sterling Products LTD service, they Specialize in Child-Friendly Clothing, they are the [url="[url=http://www.kidsclothingchina.com/ProductandService.aspx][fred color=#800080]http://www.kidsclothingchina.com/ProductandService.aspx[/fred][/url]"] kids clothing manufacturer in china[/url].
    Garments they make are a wide variety of children’s sportswear: jeans, pants, shorts, overalls, shortalls, jumpsuits, playsuits, skirts, dresses, shirts, blouses, jackets, t-shirts, sweatshirts, rompers, jog suits, body suits, swim wear, etc. The garments are typically designed as coordinated groups by creative designers in our NY office and the goods are displayed and sold as collections even though they are made in different parts of the World. The merchandise are shipped as “Floor Ready Products” which includes assorted sizes and colors, customized folding, bagging, packing, UPC coding, etc. With sizes ranging from New Born, Infant, Toddler, 4-6x, 4-7, 7-16 and 8-16 for both Boys and Girls.

    #21 Posted: 21/9/2010 - 16:14

  • Tennouji

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd September, 2007
    Location Japan
    Posts: 110
    Total reviews: 20

    Jleef - "Whilst wearing The North Face from head to toe is bound to single me out as scam-worthy..."

    I really think you are giving the scamcrew too much credit! Just pack lightly and wear what is comfortable rather than getting paranoid that someone is going to be checking your labels. Your attitude and common sense will protect you more than what you wear.

    I occasionally look like a right freakoid when I'm away, but I console myself that I scrub up far better than anyone that smirks at me!

    #22 Posted: 21/9/2010 - 21:00

  • Tennouji

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd September, 2007
    Location Japan
    Posts: 110
    Total reviews: 20

    Jleef - "Whilst wearing The North Face from head to toe is bound to single me out as scam-worthy..."

    I really think you are giving the scamcrew too much credit! Just pack lightly and wear what is comfortable rather than getting paranoid that someone is going to be checking your labels. Your attitude and common sense will protect you more than what you wear.

    I occasionally look like a right freakoid when I'm away, but I console myself that I scrub up far better than anyone that smirks at me!

    #23 Posted: 21/9/2010 - 21:01

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    I'm not allowed to do "Freakoid". My wife has this whole thing about face and appearance. Therefore, I must stay within reason.

    #24 Posted: 22/9/2010 - 09:04

  • Abskii

    Joined Travelfish
    26th October, 2010
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 5

    Here's my ten-pence worth on the technical clothing issue.....

    I've done a few short-term trips and one longer one, in 'hot' weather and have found myself sometimes really wishing I'd picked up some reliable base layers or leggings in 'moisture-wicking' fabrics.... There are loads about that don't have conspicuous logos and could make some things more comfortable (although I did end up throwing away one 'thermal baselayer' in favour of a stretch cotton primark top because it was warmer and way more comfortable) - image and blending in stops being so important when you're uncomfortable or ill, though really helps getting about with local culture.

    Granted, a full kitted-out look does scream affluence and makes you conspicuous - so there are ways of toning it down, I guess. EG:
    *Moisture-wicking leggings - to wear under dresses/skirts to stop rubbing or accidental exposure (very well recieved in muslim countries!) and even to add a thermal layer to trousers in case of a chilly night.
    *Hiking pumps/sandals - some companies, when you shop around, do some versions that are a little more discreet than some hiking sandals. I wore some merrells last time and ended up not wearing them because they rubbed so much... but climbed the Atlas mountains in my pasic kickers pumps!!
    *Jeans can be dressed up or down.
    *Un or small-logo'd t-shirts... again the moisture wicking but covers up.

    There are so many ways of mixing local clothes with yours and not looking like a 'tourist' (I mean the stereotype sort who none of us seem to want to look like!) - when I'm in India and wear one of my ancient kameese tops and scarf with my jeans, I get asked if I'm Anglo-Indian, and complimented on how nice I look (despite being pale, blotchy, dreadlocked, and on the cuddly side.... very un-glamorous). It's probably worth taking note of what the locals wear and meet in the middle.

    There are also innumerable benefits to packing light, but at events or low moments a favourite item or a little luxury/piece of home can work wonders!!!
    I'm with amazon_blonde in not being standard size and being unable to 'buy and wear', so accessories are often a winner. :)
    Sorry, there I was saying my ten pence worth.... and putting in a couple of quid.....

    #25 Posted: 29/10/2010 - 20:12

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Abskii
    "Granted, a full kitted-out look does scream affluence and makes you conspicuous - so there are ways of toning it down, I guess"

    Affluence here means respect. If you're white, and you flew here in an airplane, you've already got enough affluence for the hawkers to target you. They don't ignore white people even if they're carrying signs saying they're begging for change. They would assume it's a ruse (which it probably would be). In Africa you downplay your wealth so as to make you a less attractive target for crime. But not here - everyone who has wealth flaunts it, because it gets you respect. Just the way it is.

    #26 Posted: 29/10/2010 - 21:09

  • Abskii

    Joined Travelfish
    26th October, 2010
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 5

    Hello MADMAC!
    You make a good point - I guess when you come from a culture or mindset that is uncomfortable with displays of wealth, that can colour how you wish yourself to be seen - and how you see others.
    Maybe what I was thinking of was more the difference between someone who looks like they had been truly done in the camping shop and may be quite vulnerable to touts and scams, and someone who comes across as more savvy.
    (Not that people who do like to get kitted out are always vulnerable - but I've seen enough well-meaning holidaying people get hassled to make me wary of looking too 'new' to a country or culture.)

    #27 Posted: 29/10/2010 - 21:31

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Most of the time people who dress down here are also looked down upon. The key to appearing "Savvy" is to speak the language and actually be savvy. I mean, I speak Thai passably well, have lived here for over three years, and outside my city (where I'm pretty well known) guys will still try and cheat me. That's just what they do. So know about how much things should cost before you enter the negotiation. Last time I got off the bus from Muk in Bangkok at Rangsit a taxi driver comes up and asks me where I'm going. "Sukhimvite" I reply. He says "OK, 500 baht"... I waved my hand while walking away saying "Baw, Baw, Baw" (Issan dialect for "No, no, no"). Our negotiation was over as he was over double the price it should have cost. Jumped into a metered taxi - 190 baht when we arrived. Now I wasn't dressed to kill for an overnight bus trip... jeans and t-shirt. Even my wife encounters this crap. At home much less, but out and about... Trust no one.

    #28 Posted: 29/10/2010 - 22:50

  • eastwest

    Joined Travelfish
    17th December, 2009
    Posts: 771

    Agree with Mac on that last point.

    I always dress "normal". Long trouser (not jeans), shirt, closed shoes (cities) or flipflops (countryside). None of it is expensive or expensive looking and my experience is that it doesn't matter at all. I don't care however how local people see me (apart from where I live) since I'll always be the foreigner and their attitude only changes when I open my mouth.
    It depends on what your object is. If you're just passing through and feel happy in tank tops, so be it if the locals shake their heads behind your backs. If you try to make contact with them (more in depth) either for business or personal reasons I pay more attention to clothing.

    To come back to the technical clothes (hiking boots, north face trousers etc.):

    Unless I go to a very extreme place (which I haven't) I don't like them. Not for the appearance reason but more for the fact that they are expensive.
    When travelling it's another thing to worry about. You end up worrying about damaging them since they are so expensive. That was at least my experience when I took them on a long mountain trek holiday (long time ago). One rip in the bottom part and you're left with $200 shorts. That's not a comfortable thought when trekking and dodging every little branch that could rip your trousers.

    Much easier to walk around with cheap (decent) clothing that costs a fraction and replace when damaged. Even when you've had to buy 2-3 new pairs locally you're still cheaper off.

    #29 Posted: 30/10/2010 - 09:49

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Good points all by Eastwest. I'm a dancer, so I probaby focus a touch more on being a little GQ than he does by nature, but otherwise I agree with everything he wrote. I noted his emphasis on clean. That appeared earlier in this thread, but can't be over-stated. If you don't have enough self-respect concerning that issue, at least respect others who have to be around you.

    #30 Posted: 30/10/2010 - 10:25

  • eastwest

    Joined Travelfish
    17th December, 2009
    Posts: 771

    Oh so true.
    And I don't understand it really. Most people are clean at home (at least I hope and assume) before and after their travels but somehow there is a part of the travelcommunity that seems to think that being dirty or not washing your clothes for a long period adds to the coolness factor.
    Sometimes you hear them say things such as: "oh wow, this shirt really needs to be washed but heh, I'm backpacking! that's part of it"
    I really wonder where they got those ideas. Is there any guidebook that promotes that behaviour?

    #31 Posted: 30/10/2010 - 12:17

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    You got me - it's not just backpackers. I've seen all types indulge in that behavior, and it remains disgusting. Nothing worse than sitting on the bus next to an overweight slob in need of a shower (not to target the overweight, mind you, but then in addition to being funky they are moving their mass into my space).

    #32 Posted: 30/10/2010 - 12:30

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    p { margin-bottom: 0.08in; }The key thing is travel light.


    Bear in mind that your can buy cheap clothing and other essential items, toiletries and patent medicines just about everywhere.


    However, when you consider that the local idea of the height of fashion for men is a white nylon shirt with black stay-press polyester trousers, you might need to bring afew favorite or quality items.


    Most of the following is really drawn from experience in Thailand......




    In general the quality of clothing in S.E. Asia is quite poor and the better quality stuff (world brands etc.) isn't much cheaper than elsewhere – multi-national pricing etc.


    In a hot humid climate you might want to look into fabrics.


    Firstly a lot of “summer” clothes bought in a northern climate are simply to hot and heavy for the very hot, humid climate of S.E. Asia. Unless you are climbing hills and mountains in the North that is.


    Anything in linen is a good idea. We all know linen has a Rumpled” look but it absorbs moisture from the body, keeps you cooler than cotton and dries out more quickly. You can buy some linen garments in Thailand.


    There are also the new synthetic multi-layered materials, which you could buy at home or in the city shopping malls.


    At the end of the day though if you come with nothing at all, you will be able to buy appropriate garments that will last you for you trip and won't break the bank.


    If you are very large – you might encounter some problems, but you could always get some stuff tailor-made!?!?!

    One more thing - you might want to get some light colored long sleeved and long-legged items as protection against mosquitoes.

    #33 Posted: 1/11/2010 - 11:34

  • Abskii

    Joined Travelfish
    26th October, 2010
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 5

    eastwest... again, very true!! Even if it's a bit tricky to do any laundry (fast turnaround, unexpected events, etc) it's always possible to be physically clean - and then the grounding effect of doing laundry when you've had a turbulent few days. But to choose not to...why!?
    I would say that it's an essential up there with travel insurance...not just for sociability, but also health!

    #34 Posted: 2/11/2010 - 23:01

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    A veritable gold mine for those wishing to be the epitome of sartorial elegance.

    so nice to hear the MM has "upper class" friends in the main. I wonder what they make of him. Especially on his dress sense.

    #35 Posted: 22/11/2010 - 10:00

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "so nice to hear the MM has "upper class" friends in the main. I wonder what they make of him. Especially on his dress sense."

    I believe they consider me "cheeky" Wilko.But I do have some very nice clothes for special occassions. But in the main, I always dress GQ - as I said, my wife insists on it.

    #36 Posted: 23/11/2010 - 15:59

  • williamducl-
    es

    Joined Travelfish
    23rd October, 2010
    Posts: 19

    I assume it would be humid in this part of asia and less clothing is preferred

    #37 Posted: 23/11/2010 - 17:06

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    William
    I live in the Northeast, right on the Mekong. During the day, it's usually pretty warm, but at night and early morning, it's chilly. It often gets into the low teens (celsius). Particularly on a bike, you feel it if you aren't dressed reasonably warmly (Jacket, jeans, long sleeved shirt).
    Also, if you are going to be exposed to a lot of direct sunlight, then it's a good idea to wear lightweight, long sleeved shirts - the sun here can be particularly fierce.

    #38 Posted: 23/11/2010 - 17:32

  • williamducl-
    es

    Joined Travelfish
    23rd October, 2010
    Posts: 19

    Thanks a lot for the information.

    #39 Posted: 24/11/2010 - 22:10

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    GQ - ??? THey must be impressed!!!

    #40 Posted: 24/11/2010 - 22:45

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    A lot of Thai guys are well dressed too - so they aren't that impressed. More impressed with the dancing, since I've been working on that for a very, very long time.

    #41 Posted: 24/11/2010 - 23:13

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    MM - As Thailand's hi-so gun-toting travel guru, perhaps you should start a regular column on fashion? I'd hang on your every word.

    #42 Posted: 25/11/2010 - 08:50

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "Gun toting"? I wish I was "toting" one here. Just getting one is tough enough.

    As for fashion, I don't actually follow it like a hobby. I just don't go out of the house looking like a dork.

    #43 Posted: 25/11/2010 - 10:04

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Your posts on this thread might be construed as contradicting that!

    #44 Posted: 25/11/2010 - 15:12

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Miscontrued.

    #45 Posted: 25/11/2010 - 16:52

  • williamducl-
    es

    Joined Travelfish
    23rd October, 2010
    Posts: 19

    Misconstrued?

    #46 Posted: 26/11/2010 - 22:35

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Indeed, missed the "S"

    #47 Posted: 26/11/2010 - 23:17

  • williamducl-
    es

    Joined Travelfish
    23rd October, 2010
    Posts: 19

    The 'S' can change the meaning.

    #48 Posted: 1/12/2010 - 21:12

  • errik

    Joined Travelfish
    28th October, 2010
    Posts: 28

    In terms of clothing, I juts follow the hippie way.

    #49 Posted: 3/12/2010 - 17:19

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "In terms of clothing, I juts follow the hippie way."

    My wife would shoot me.

    Errik, do you do that when you're home, or just here?

    #50 Posted: 4/12/2010 - 00:27

  • errik

    Joined Travelfish
    28th October, 2010
    Posts: 28

    No no, only for travel, not at home though.

    #51 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 19:58

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    I made the mistake of packing a jumper (sweater to you yanks) when I came here, which takes up space and gets in the way every time I'm repacking. It's something ridiculous like 1500 baht a kilo to mail anything back to Australia, so I'm more or less stuck with it.

    If I were packing back home now, with what I know now, I'd bring 3 good t-shirts, 1-2 cotton short sleeve shirts, a singlet for very hot days and the gym, a pair of jeans, a pair of robust sports shoes, pair of thongs and maybe one lightweight long sleeve top that can keep the mozzies off or warm you up in the cinemas where they crank the AC. Oh, and 4 pairs of cargo shorts - those extra pockets always come in handy when you're on the go. I know some people here think you can't wear the same tee more than once, but if you're slender bloke who doesn't sweat profusely, you can get away with a 2nd wear with a bit of deoderant. Saves on laundry trips/costs.

    I'm no veteran traveler like the rest of the forum regulars here, but I have packed and unpacked that damn backpack enough times between guesthouses to know what's necessary and what's superfluous.

    As far as dressing like an expat or someone who's not a FOP (Fresh Off the Plane), to coin an acronym, I reckon a good deal of hustling can be avoided if you display the right, bugger-off-and-leave-me-alone body language when you're walking past the spruikers and taxi drivers. Oh, and if you've got a motorbike key to wave in their faces they'll stop offering you tuk tuk rides too. You don't even have to mutter "no thanks" for the eighty billionth time.

    #52 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 20:48

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    I made the mistake of packing a jumper (sweater to you yanks) when I came here, which takes up space and gets in the way every time I'm repacking. It's something ridiculous like 1500 baht a kilo to mail anything back to Australia, so I'm more or less stuck with it.

    If I were packing back home now, with what I know now, I'd bring 3 good t-shirts, 1-2 cotton short sleeve shirts, a singlet for very hot days and the gym, a pair of jeans, a pair of robust sports shoes, pair of thongs and maybe one lightweight long sleeve top that can keep the mozzies off or warm you up in the cinemas where they crank the AC. Oh, and 4 pairs of cargo shorts - those extra pockets always come in handy when you're on the go. I know some people here think you can't wear the same tee more than once, but if you're slender bloke who doesn't sweat profusely, you can get away with a 2nd wear with a bit of deoderant. Saves on laundry trips/costs.

    I'm no veteran traveler like the rest of the forum regulars here, but I have packed and unpacked that damn backpack enough times between guesthouses to know what's necessary and what's superfluous.

    As far as dressing like an expat or someone who's not a FOP (Fresh Off the Plane), to coin an acronym, I reckon a good deal of hustling can be avoided if you display the right, bugger-off-and-leave-me-alone body language when you're walking past the spruikers and taxi drivers. Oh, and if you've got a motorbike key to wave in their faces they'll stop offering you tuk tuk rides too. You don't even have to mutter "no thanks" for the eighty billionth time.

    #53 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 21:13

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "No no, only for travel, not at home though."

    Errik
    Why would you dress that way here, when you don't back home?

    #54 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 21:25

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    You might want to translate
    "singlet"
    and "thongs" for the Poms who will be getting a very strange idea of what you are wearing!

    You are right, deffo, on arrival just don't look like a victim.

    At the airport, try not to wander around looking lost or waving maps about - it just invites "help'
    look ahead and read the signs so you know where you're going and if you need to look at a map or something, go to a cafe or loo.

    Get ready before you land - you've hours of time on the plane -
    if you have a hotel or contact address, write it down clearly on a piece of paper or note book and keep it somewhere accessible. That way you don't have to drop all your luggage and empty it in the middle of arrivals looking for your hotel address or what ever.

    If you dress like an expat - or MM you'll just get taxi drivers trying to fix you up with a woman or take you to their mate's go-go bar.

    #55 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 21:26

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Oh right, thong means like g-string outside of Aus, right?

    Ok err... thongs = sandals

    and singlet = um, tank top is it? A tee shirt without sleeves is a singlet. Maybe you'd call it an undershirt. Ok, I got it. You know the blood-stained white top Maclane/Willis runs around in in Die Hard 3? That thing. That's a singlet. Good for gym stuff.

    In Krabi Town you can't stop for one second to admire the surreal landscape without three or more longtail drivers trying to rip you off on a quick tour around the harbour. It's enough to make you want to buy one of those "No I don't want an fn massage or a tuk tuk ride" shirts...

    ...do they work?

    #56 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 21:32

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    I-phone - good idea.

    Yes if you say singlet and thongs to a Pom they conjure up a vision of some kinky Shakespearean sex outfit.

    #57 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:01

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    ...and speedos are things that tell you how fast your car is going.

    #58 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:02

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Oh, one more tip - if you've got an iPhone, get in a wifi spot and pre-cache a map of the area you're visiting before you get there. If you know where you want to go, mark it on the map and then use the GPS to keep yourself on track as you walk.

    You don't need to be connected to the net to do this. As long as you have a sim card in the phone, it'll triangulate your position and show it on the map.

    It's way easier to pull a phone out of your pocket and check it than some huge, pain in the a--se map. And you don't necessarily look lost doing it, so the taxi drivers won't immediately swarm on you. Just don't stand in one spot too long.

    I've saved hundreds of hours of wandering/driving around aimlessly lost by doing this. It's almost enough to justify the overpriced mobile phone contract I'm paying off for the next 12 months.

    #59 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:07

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Wanton speedos are also a good indicator you shouldn't vote for the politician wearing them.

    Good lord, what would the world make of Tony Abbott on his day off?

    #60 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:10

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "If you dress like an expat - or MM you'll just get taxi drivers trying to fix you up with a woman or take you to their mate's go-go bar."

    Hmmm, this does happen in Bangkok with alarming frequency. Could be the clothes, because I refuse to dress like a dork.

    #61 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:19

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Now you mention it, when he's in the lycra,TA - does actually look like a Shakespearean sex deviant

    #62 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:34

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    @Khunwilko - Sure... "looks like"...

    @MM - I refuse to dress like a dork too, except on wash day. Then it's whatever's still clean, like swimming shorts and a tailored shirt. Makes for an eye catching combo.

    #63 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:37

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    I'm guessing a "dork" wouldn't know if he dressed like a dork would he?

    i bet you wear cargo pants!
    or jeans with a faded line down the front from where you insist your wife irons a crease in them

    #64 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:39

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    No jeans with creases. And my wife doesn't iron, the maid does that!

    I've wondered about that. Does a dork know that he dresses like a dork but identifies himself as a dork and therefore dresses the part? Much in the way that a hippie dresses like a hippie. He must know he looks riduculous, but identifies himself that way, hence the dress code.

    I do wear pants with cargo pockets - not all of the time of course. I have a pair on right now, and they look good. Weren't cheap either. Like I said, my wife has a sense of style, and she's not about to let me walk around looking like a dork. Not happening. Also, I'm a dance instructor, and a certain sense of fashion goes with that. I would say ask Bruce, who has seen photos of me, but he's been banished.

    #65 Posted: 7/12/2010 - 22:46

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Dance instructor? What kind of dance?
    Is it the sort you see in the movies where a cowboy gets out his Smith and Wesson and fires at someones feet saying "OK let's see ya dance!"

    PLEASE don't say ballroom!

    #66 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:14

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    What's wrong with cargo shorts? All those pockets come in handy, I tell ya.

    I'm a huge fan of the army camo print shorts. They look good, IMO, they're robust and they don't show stains. What more could a traveler need?

    MadMac, you're settled in one place. Of course you can dress better if you have a stationary wardrobe to keep all your outfits for whatever occasion, and not a backpack with limited space and weight restrictions.

    I may look like a bum compared to how I'd dress for work back home, but still, standing next to some of the degenerate expats and seedy old German tourists in Patong, I look like I was dressed by Giorgio Armani.

    #67 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:19

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Yeah, it's hard to imagine MadMac, a hardened ex-military man, slipping on a leotard and prancing about the room.

    The 6-shooter to the feet style of dance instruction, now that I could see...

    #68 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:24

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Camouflage! Don't those people realise - WE CAN STILL SEE THEM!

    #69 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:33

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    for MM it's probably the military two step!

    #70 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:34

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    "Camouflage! Don't those people realise - WE CAN STILL SEE THEM!"

    I dunno, I've snuck past the traffic cops in patong a few times in my camo shorts. Since it's a 300 baht fine for being a farang on a bike if they get you, the wondrous shorts have paid for themselves many times over.

    #71 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:36

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Remember this is the man who recommends that the essential fashion accessory if you are "hiking through the jungle" is a gun!

    #72 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:37

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    My God! How BIG are your shorts???

    Private Somchai: "Look Captain, a bush on wheels"
    Captain; "Let it go, it's only farang we're looking for"

    (BTW - I think you're being ripped off twice - first paying the bribe and secondly you should be paying about 200)

    #73 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:41

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    I don't know what the vendors pay for shorts and what their markup is (if you know pls tell me), but you're lucky to find a pair for under 300 in Patong. One surly woman on Ratutit Rd was asking 650 a pair - "Ok, ok, 600 discount for you." I told her I'd seen the same stuff for 200 around the corner at Otop and she simply threw the calculator down in disgust and pouted.

    "How much for some manners?" I asked her.

    Didn't get a quote on that one.

    #74 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 09:46

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Since you gentlemen asked, I teach salsa. And have for four years. I was teaching even when I was still on active duty, in Germany. And no, obviously (I hope obviously) no leotards.

    "I may look like a bum compared to how I'd dress for work back home, but still, standing next to some of the degenerate expats and seedy old German tourists in Patong, I look like I was dressed by Giorgio Armani."

    A valid point. There are most certainly some expats running around here who are both fashion and hygenically challenged. Whoa be it for me to try and defend them either.

    But even with a backpack, I take decent clothes - there is just no reason to look like the bum of the month.

    #75 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 10:01

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    @Madmac - Define "decent" clothes.

    It's too hot for pants and long sleeved tailored shirts. And since you have to remove footwear every 5 mins to avoid tracking mud inside, it's impractical to wear anything but thongs/sandals.

    What kind of shorts are considered fashionable? What's the shorts hierarchy?

    #76 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 10:12

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    ROFL

    #77 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 10:16

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Hierarchy?

    wouldn't it be nice if you could catagorise fashion sense and pigeonhole it.

    If you take the accumulated thoughts of someone on fashion you build up a picture - and some are funnier than others.

    THe main problem with expats is they don't seem to realise how old they are - many over here live in a fantasy world and dress accordingly.

    however they also lack any fashion sense, so one sees a uniform developing
    Cargo pants and short sleeved polyester shirts.
    Practical maybe fashionable? No!
    The other thing is they also seem totally unaware of what they look like - they think they are hidden in conformity - which of course id the antithesis of fashion.
    What you wear and how you wear it are important to some. Others seem to be quite happy to declare their lack of creativity wherever they go by wearing the most boring of stuff.

    Traveling in the topics for most people means they won't wear the same as they wore at home, so maybe the "hippy" look is good for a Westerner on and around the beach. Light colored lightweight fabrics are good for those not acclimatised to the heat and humidity.

    BTW - Ironing is NOT fashion - many clothes are designed to be "rumpled" - only a total philistine would iron everything - I bet MM's maid has to iron his socks and underwear too!

    #78 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 10:32

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    MM would have to define "decent" first

    #79 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 10:33

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    I wouldn't be caught dead in shorts. First of all, they don't protect the legs from anything. Put your bike down when wearing shorts, and you'll have even more serious road rash than normal.

    "It's too hot for pants and long sleeved tailored shirts."

    I seldom wear tailored shirts, but I always wear shirts and usually lightweight, long sleeved shirts. Protects your arms from exposure to direct sunlight and insect bite. Same with pants. And it's definitely NOT too hot for these. I even wear long pants when living in East Africa, which was much hotter than Isaan.

    "And since you have to remove footwear every 5 mins to avoid tracking mud inside, it's impractical to wear anything but thongs/sandals."

    I remove my footwear when entering temple buildings - which happens about once a year - and when entering someones home. That's it. It's not that frequent. I would NEVER wear sandals - again, doesn't protect your feet from anything. If you have to right your bike and your wearing sandals - it's going to suck. I ride either my chopper or my CBR every day. Sandals are just a no go for anyone who really rides and knows what he's doing. Also, mosquitos love to bite feet - convenient exposed target. And mosquitos, as my wife and son can testify - can carry dengue, which completely, and totally sucks to get. So they are out!

    #80 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 10:38

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Degue seems to not be too prevalent in the South, which is pretty much all I've seen so far.

    Thongs can be a real pain to walk in when the ground is wet - why the hell do they use those slippery tiles on the main footpaths outside shops, an accident waiting to happen they are - There's nothing I hate more than that slippy feeling of foot against rubber after stepping in a puddle while wearing thongs...

    But I only have room for one pair of shoes and so many people's shops here are also their homes. I feel guilty dirtying up their floors with my shoes when I can see they've just finished mopping.

    If I can get some pants education on what's lightweight and stylish, I'll invest in some new ones. I only have one pair of jeans at the moment, and denim is hot and heavy.

    The tailors have given me a few lessons in fabric while I feigned interest for a free beer and a laugh occasionally, but the alcohol made me forget what they said - what should you make a lightweight pant out of?

    I'll improve my fashion if I can stay comfortable, but as a straight male I'm only prepared to invest so much time in the whole thing.

    #81 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 11:18

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    "Degue seems to not be too prevalent in the South, which is pretty much all I've seen so far."



    assuming you mean Dengue - that is dangerously incorrect

    #82 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 11:48

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    I do mean Dengue.

    Ok, I'll be more specific - In Phuket and Krabi I haven't been given any reason to worry about Dengue fever.

    Is it kicking about in some of the less backpackery-touristic areas outside of these two places or am I at risk without knowing it?

    #83 Posted: 8/12/2010 - 11:51

  • neosho

    Joined Travelfish
    13th August, 2008
    Posts: 386

    If you want to see what not to wear, go to a website called "people of walmart". Actual pictures of Walmart customers in the US. Funny , yet sickening at the same time.
    Don't know for sure but I think Dengue can be had anywhere in the country. I've heard it referred to as the bone break disease.

    #84 Posted: 9/12/2010 - 08:49

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    MM - walmart - WM it's al the same!

    #85 Posted: 9/12/2010 - 09:07

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    There seems to be a common assumption that Dengue is a rural or out of the way thing - quite the contrary is true.

    THe Dengue carrying mosquito is an Urban and daylight mozzie - many tourists have returned home to be diagnosed with Dengue.

    THe main problem is that a lot of infections - first time - are so mild that the person just thinks they have a cold or flu.

    #86 Posted: 9/12/2010 - 09:10

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Wilko
    I would say that's not a problem. Since it doesn't recur, like Malaria can, if you just think you got the flu and it passes, that's not such a big deal. But if you get really, really sick, not only does that totally suck but it can kill you. I spent enough time in the hospital at my son and my wife's bedside to realize this is something you really don't want to get. There are, however, four different versions of the disease, and some are, as you suggested, mild in both symptoms and virility.

    As for Walmart - hey, if it works for some people, great. But you wouldn't catch me dead in there. It's kind of like K-mart. And for anyone who ever saw Rainmain: "K-mart sucks."

    #87 Posted: 9/12/2010 - 11:04

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Bone Break disease? I do not like the sound of that. Reminds me of how my legs feel on those minivan rides though...

    I have flu/cold like symptoms right now. Could be dengue? The little dangley thing in the back of my throat is swollen and feels tender. I reckon it's brushing/gargling with the tap water that's done it, but I did have a nasty big mozzie bite on my leg the other day. Hmmm. Shoulda worn pants and shoes like Madmac.

    #88 Posted: 9/12/2010 - 15:25

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Cranky
    My wife was in such pain she was howling and crying. My son was more stoic, but he was VERY uncomfortable. And in both cases there was concern about the course of the disease and it took over a week for them to get out of the woods. Dengue sucks - you don't want. If you hemorage, there's a good chance you'll die.

    #89 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 10:40

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    MM - do your research.
    There are several strains of dengue - this is why an inoculation is so long in coming.

    You can be immune to one but not another.
    It now is widely believed that subsequent infections are worse as the antibodies crated by the first infection react incorrectly against a secondary attack.

    Carrot - the size of the bite has nothing to do with your chances of infection.

    #90 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 10:48

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    "MM - do your research.
    There are several strains of dengue - this is why an inoculation is so long in coming."

    I believe I said that there are several strains. Actually I think it's four - but who's counting? Did you read? Some strains are more virulent than others.

    "You can be immune to one but not another."

    I haven't heard of immunity. Like every illness, some are affected more, some less, to the same strain. The point is, though, you don't want to get it. My son's infection was very likely his first, and he was VERY sick.

    "It now is widely believed that subsequent infections are worse as the antibodies crated by the first infection react incorrectly against a secondary attack."

    I've also read that initial infections weaken the bodies immune system against subsequent attack. Whatever the reality, you don't want to get it ever. Not the first time, not a subsequent time. It's a crap shoot on how it's going to play out. Like I said, my wife and son got it within two days of each other and they were both VERY sick.

    #91 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 11:32

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Well I'm sorry MM but as ever you are only in possession of part of the picuture- you are under the impression that it doesn't recur

    "I would say that's not a problem. Since it doesn't recur, like Malaria can, "
    - IT DOES Recur!

    You have no idea whether your son had the illness before as it can be so mild you may overlook it.
    I in no place stated that a first infection WASN"T possibly severe.
    I pointed out that the current research seems to indicate that SUBSEQUENT infections can be compounded and become even more serious.


    I find you are a particularly obtuse and ignorant person who frequently posts very bad advice on this site largely due to your profound ignorance and your faiure to realise it.
    THis thread is about clothing - ad dengue is without doubt a pertinent side line to that.
    however if you want to give advice - DO YOUR RESEARCH - you post was misleading and you appear to be too stupid to realise this - your sort of posts are dangerous.
    The fact that your family may or my not have had dengue shows that you have been almost 100% failure in protecting yourself against the disease - so why would you proffer any advice??

    #92 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 11:46

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    The ONLY piece of advice I gave here was that wearing clothing which minimizes the possibility of being bitten by mosquitos. Is there something in that advice you would consider bad, *******?

    I find you a particular obnoxious know it all, but we have to live with each other here on the net don't we? So **** off.

    As for Dengue - I took this directly from a medical site. Please tell me where what I wrote previously was incorrect?

    "IT IS true that a second dengue infection can be very serious. However, this more severe form of dengue - dengue haemorrhagic fever - is very rare. Dengue fever is a viral infection spread via mosquitoes that classically involves high temperatures and muscle pains, among other symptoms. There are four serotypes, or strains, of the dengue virus, all of which can cause the disease. Once you develop the infection from one serotype, you are generally immune from getting the infection again from that serotype but you are not protected against the other three serotypes. Should you get infected with one of these other serotypes it is thought there is a risk that the antibodies you already have in your body from the previous infection could cause a severe reaction, which is the haemorrhagic fever. As the name implies this more serious disease is characterised by fever and bleeding, and can lead to shock and even death in its severest form. Fortunately it is not common and children are more at risk than adults, but nonetheless it would be wise to be extra vigilant in avoiding being bitten by mosquitoes in areas at high risk of dengue fever."

    As for recurrence, as you saying that my son could be living in Germany and two years from now get sick again from dormant Dengue in his body? Because our physician told us the exact opposite.

    #93 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 12:04

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    In the face of the obvious you have attempted a complete volte-face - even that you can't get right.........you should look at medical sites BEFORE you post - however it will do you little good.

    "I got it off a medical site* - how daft can you be? Have you no idea how to read up on something - I doubt you even read at all!

    I get so sick and tired of half-wits who thing that because they can
    "google" they can spout off on anything.

    You can google all you like but unless you understand how to sort information you'd be better off just sitting in your long pants and drinking yourself even more stupid.


    go clean your guns -you sad little man

    #94 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 12:51

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    "As for recurrence, as you saying that my son could be living in Germany and two years from now get sick again from dormant Dengue in his body? " you really have limited powers of comprehension don't you!

    #95 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 13:25

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Whoa boy. I didn't check this thread for a bit. Are you guys fighting? If you want to get really p'd off, try lugging 25kgs around beautiful Hat Yai looking for a guesthouse that has wifi and hot showers for under 400thb.

    And why do they put the bus station so friggin far away from the train station?? Grrrrr!!!

    PS Dengue sucks!

    #96 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 13:29

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    "I've also read that initial infections weaken the bodies immune system against subsequent attack."

    Disproving once and for all that whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger. Always knew that was BS...

    #97 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 13:33

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Wow, just caught up.

    I think this thread is done, lol.

    #98 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 13:50

  • busylizzy

    Joined Travelfish
    31st December, 2007
    Location New Zealand
    Posts: 2073
    Total reviews: 20
    Places visited:
    At least 107

    C'mon boys, time to retreat to the corners of your sandpit.

    Didn't you mothers teach you that if you have nothing nice to say, say nuthin'?!

    #99 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 14:23

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Hey Bizzy, why don't we vote for who's right and who's wrong?

    You go first

    #100 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 14:34

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    Fight the real enemy: mosquitoes.

    There's one buzzing around my ankles under the table at this cafe as we speak. Possible propagator of dengue...

    How do you say mosquito in Thai? I want to see if they've got any repellant

    #101 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 14:38

  • busylizzy

    Joined Travelfish
    31st December, 2007
    Location New Zealand
    Posts: 2073
    Total reviews: 20
    Places visited:
    At least 107

    Nah, I don't want to play. I'll just stay happily perched on the fence. I like to hear both sides - as long as they don't resort to name-calling, and "mine's bigger than yours" boy talk. Mai pen rai!

    Not sure what the Thai word for mozzie is but I'm sure Mac can help out. But I've always loved the Indonesian word for it:: nyamuk. You have to say it kind of like a plane coming in for a landing then doing a nosedive crash. NnnnnnnyyyyyyyyyaaaaaaaaaMUK! Very appropriate for the little buggers, me thinks!

    #102 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 15:09

  • CrankyCarrot

    Click here to learn more about CrankyCarrot
    Joined Travelfish
    24th March, 2010
    Location Thailand
    Posts: 662

    I just learned the Thai word for those little gecko/lizard thingies you see everywhere: Jing Jocks

    #103 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 15:23

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Liz, Cranky, the guy is just a cockbite. He always was. Somtam has told him before to knock it off, and I told Somtam he wouldn't. He's nothing if not predictable. The guy is just a loser. What are you going to do? You're bound to run into one once in a while.

    #104 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 17:29

  • Sparts

    Joined Travelfish
    5th June, 2009
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 165
    Places visited:
    At least 17

    Haha BusyLizzy, I believe name calling has already entered the discussion....
    Knock it off Khuntwilko, you are being a bit of an ass.

    Now you two go get a room together and make up, I can't styand all this agro :)

    BTW MADMAC, I miss BruceMoon.. any word on the old man? Does he still have his website/blog?

    #105 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 17:39

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Sparts
    I get emails from him frequently. He and I had a long discussion on Marx and Engels last week. He's cutting down on his travel now - no more than two trips a year! Funny. And as far as I know, he still has his blog.

    #106 Posted: 10/12/2010 - 22:07

  • khunwilko

    Joined Travelfish
    27th January, 2007
    Posts: 560

    Sadly MM thought Marx and Engels was a shop in England where you buy shirts and stay-press trousers

    #107 Posted: 11/12/2010 - 11:05

  • MADMAC

    Joined Travelfish
    6th June, 2009
    Posts: 6220
    Total reviews: 10

    Marx and Engels is the name of a shop in England? Actually I didn't know this. I've never been to England.

    #108 Posted: 11/12/2010 - 11:18

  • Kbrow15

    Joined Travelfish
    13th May, 2014
    Posts: 2

    When I went To Thailand I brought 3 tank tops and 3 shorts. You can buy most stuff there if you're not a huge guy (huge muslces etc) Personally I just wore the same clothes over and over. I gained one tank top but lost one. You're usually in your bathing suit for the most part anyway, and no one cares what you look like there because it's so hot out!!!

    #109 Posted: 13/5/2014 - 15:01

Have questions? Jump to our menu of forum quicklinks

Add your reply

Your reply

Check this box if you want to be notified of replies.

Please be familiar with our user guidelines before you post. Thanks!

Businesses planning on plugging their guesthouse / hotel / karaoke bar should read our "Addition guidelines" very carefully.

You need to be logged in to answer an existing post on the Travelfish forums. Please login via the prompts just above and refresh this screen -- before writing your post -- and you'll be in business.

Possibly related discussions Replies  Views  Latest reply
What clothes to pack - formal clothing necessary? ... By c1ee on 26 Oct 2009 6 4134 28 Oct 2009