Health and safety forum

Bed bugs on the road any idea's?

  • patrickien

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    Recently while looking through hostel refernces for Bangkok I came across a few cases of lost sleep due to bed bugs, so I surfed the net for more info.
    Theres plenty of info but its all to do with getting rid of them and noyhing about preventing them when your on the road!!
    Has anybody got any words of wisdom? or does anybody know of something that works to ensure a peacefull sleep? talc powder? dettol? let me know greetings patrickien.

    #1 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 03:02

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  • somtam2000

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    A sleepsheet can be a good option -- unless the bed is totally infested, it should stop most from biting you.

    #2 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 05:34

  • BruceMoon

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    patrickien

    First, is your body that sensitive that you cannot sleep when exposed to bed bugs?

    If not, and you sleep well, what is the concern?

    If you do suffer from a condition where bed bugs cause you to stay awake, then I'd suggest you not go to SE Asia (honestly).

    IMHO, I suggest it unlikely that beds in SE Asian hotels, Guest Houses, etc., are sufficiently cleaned to eradicate bedbugs.

    Second, I'm advised that a good vacuum of the bed will eradicate bed bugs. So, as well as the kitchen sink and all other precautionary 'tools', drugs, etc., maybe you could also take 2 vacuum cleaners - one for 240v and another for 110v. (heheheheh (sorry couldn't resist on that one).

    Cheers

    #3 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 05:37

  • MADMAC

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    I have never encountered bed bugs here. But I always stay at the same guest house in Bangkok, and my wife will only let us stay in 4 or 5 star hotels otherwise. So maybe it's more of an issue in cheap places. I don't know.

    #4 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 11:04

  • patrickien

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    Thanks to everbody for the advice, Bruce you wanted know if my bodys that sensitive? I dont know cos I haven't had the pleasure of cuddling up to bed bugs in the last 30 years (first trip to india) as for the kitchen sink I left that in manchester when I left (31 years ago).
    and the vacuum cleaner doesn't fit in my back pocket so I left that behind as well.
    But thanks for your concern and that "down under" wit!!
    greetings Patrickien.

    Madmac , according to the reports from america where they seem to have a bedbug plague ,these little insects are not fussy and can be found in all sorts of hotels, apparently the insecticide/chemicals that they used to prevent them have been banned and theyve spread over the whole country, on top of that they travel extremly well !! in clothes ,rucksacks or anything they can crawl into, + are heat/cold resistant and only need to eat for about 10 minutes per year to stay alive!!
    Anyway I hope you dont meet any ! greetings patrickien

    #5 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 14:42

  • whiteelepha-
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    in the past i have burned a mosquiote coil under the bed and that seemed to help with the bugs. It also helps if you eat a lot of garlic as they don't like the scent that puts on your skin.

    #6 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 17:37

  • BruceMoon

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    patrickien

    I noted the comments of whiteelephant and the minds went...

    If too much garlic doesn't do it, try heaps of chilli they'd have to be repelled by chilli.

    Or, if you are really worried drink heaps of grog, they'd get drunk on the smell and leave you alone


    - - -

    Seriously, for a second. We here in Australia also have the fear mongeres carrying on about bed bugs etc.

    These fear mongerers would have us believe that only pest control companies are able to relieve us of the problem (and they relieve us of money as well). And, bed manufacturers recommend that a bed is bed bug proof for only a couple of years.

    And, the chemical companies selling household cleaners also do their work on TV about bed bugs.

    I honestly believe that bed bugs is a euphamism for fear based money making.

    I do understand that some with hay fever problems and/or asthma can be affected by bed bug shit (funny it's not the bugs, it's their shit!!).

    For me, I've slep in some pretty ordinary places (and some good ones). From my environmental science background, I suggest it is reasonable to believe that bed bugs will be a global phenomena as every traveller will carry same from one hotel to another, from one home to another, etc., etc.

    But, unless one is prone to a bed bug reaction, I doubt you'd be troubled.

    Cheers

    #7 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 18:36

  • MADMAC

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    Well, Bruce, from what I've read from WW II POWS held in Thailand, Bed bugs were a serious problem really impacting on prisoners health because they were preventing sleep. But I'm not an expert on the things.

    Patrick
    I haven't lived in the US for any length of time since 1984 and I don't plan on returning, so it's not much of an issue for me there either.

    #8 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 19:59

  • prana16

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    I'm in Chiang Mai currently and last week I was absolutely raped by bed bugs. They are no joke. As far as i know i've never been bitten before (maybe one and thought it was a mosquito). Last week i awoke to 60 - 70 bites down both arms and about 20 on my torso and many many on my legs. This was not just a little itchy mosquito bite. I looked like a had some sort of terrible disease. A week later and a new guesthouse and I still have not healed totally and still find it hard to get to sleep.

    I hope no one else has this issue as its horrible and you become stressed about sleep, your bag, clothes and every new guesthouse you go to.

    I know for a fact that the room I was in had the sheet changed and was re-rented immediately and i was moved to another room that also had bugs. I "slept" with the lights on which keeps them at bay to a degree.
    Had all my clothes laundered, took everything out of my pack inspected it and drowned my pack in a bucket of water and detol (read somewhere that they drown if in water) had to look through every page of every book and inspect every seam on all clothing. It sucked balls.

    Another very very popular guesthouse here in Chiang Mai thats always full up had some people itching and complaining of bites at reception when I went to see about a room and they were also just shuttled into another room likely with bugs in their clothes and their old room likely re-rented immediately. So heads up check rooms thoroughly for little blood spots on the sheet, mattress etc and keep your bags and clothes off the bed

    I had always heard that sleep sheets help with bed bugs but the bugs i saw i don't see how they wouldn't just crawl in the sheet .. (or through the weave as they are incredibly thin) or just end up biting your face.

    I had also always thought that you could not really see bed bugs and they were really really fast. Its true that the small young ones are hard to see and translucent but the older ones can definitely be seen and picked up between finger and thumb. Usually brownish and not actually that fast. They are shaped kind of like spades (on playing cards) when you look from the top, but if you pick one up and turn it they are really really thin which is why they can hide in seams of clothing, behind peeling paint, between pages of books and tourist pamphlets (i found one there) and can crawl through the weave of sheets and cloth. SO KEEP ALL BAGS, CLOTHES AND BOOKS OFF THE BED. If you get bit you can move and at least not worry as much about all your stuff.

    Up to this point i've been a very chilled out light and quick kinda traveler hopefully this was just an anomaly.

    #9 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 22:53

  • Nokka

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    These things are no joke. A group of us went to a nice hotel in the Cotswolds last year. A couple of my friends had a similar experience to prana16, absolutely covered in bites. This was nice hotel. They felt unwell for several days afterwards, had to take time off work (both dentists) and were eventually compensated by the hotel with, I think, about £2000 each.

    My wife and I also got scabies a few years ago after staying in a nice hotel in Chianti en Greve in Tuscany. Again, a nice hotel.....you can never be sure.

    #10 Posted: 22/7/2009 - 23:08

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  • BruceMoon

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    prana16

    I sympathise with you. As I noted above, if a person reacts to bed bugs, SE Asia isn't a place I'd recommend.

    For those that want to know all the gory details, try reading this.

    As for your 'itchy bites' (as kids in Australia refer to them) might I suggest a two-fold approach.

    First, any exposed parts of your skin ought be treated with an Iodine Antiseptic Topical Solution (many brands on the market, Betadine or Povodine are the most common). This cleanses the area.

    Second, taking the 'itch' out is often a harder problem. I've heard of toothpaste being used, but I prefer ti-tree oil (somehow, and I don't know why, it affects the relationship between the 'juices' inserted by the bug and the human lymphatic reaction). It may be hard to find in SE Asia. But, to those I've recommended, they all say it works.

    Ti-tree oil is a better antiseptic than Iodine Antiseptic Topical Solution, but the latter tends to seal the exposed skin faster than ti-tree oil (and the latter can 'sting').

    Oh, ti-tree oil may be sold as Tea-Tree Oil or Melaleuca oil. A write-up can be found here and the range of uses here.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers

    #11 Posted: 23/7/2009 - 05:46

  • smash

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    well this all sounds disgusting!

    #12 Posted: 23/7/2009 - 07:48

  • Intrepid82

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    Indeed!

    :(

    #13 Posted: 23/7/2009 - 12:51

  • patrickien

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    Hi, Happy and Itchy travelers.
    Prana 16 thanks for the warning, your experience was wot I was afraid of and I'll keep looking for a deterent! (Hope the ichings getting Less.)

    Nokka, What you wrote was what i'd heard and read ,that it's not just an SE asia thing and definitly NO JOKE.

    Bruceee baby !! Thanks for the (this time) very helpfull info over beastys and Tea tree oil, just in case i ever come down under do you have many problems with kangaroo fleas ?or have all the kanga's already been exterminated ???

    Greetings and happy travels, patrickien

    #14 Posted: 23/7/2009 - 14:26

  • kiwibc

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    We've been travelling for a while round asia with no issues (fleas or bedbugs). The only time we had them was in NZ and they weren't nice! Often the bites take a week or two to come up so if you're constantly on the move you might not know where you got them from.

    In an addition to somtam2000's comments about sleeping sheets we bought them as a just in case (turned out handy on the night buses) and we soaked them in Permethrin before we left which is an effective insect repellent. You can buy the kits cheaply at travel doctors and outdoor stores (I believe). They're designed for clothing but work ok on silk & cotton sleeping sheets.

    #15 Posted: 23/7/2009 - 19:52

  • patrickien

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    kiwibc,thanks for your mail,Ive been looking Permethrin up on the net and come across a company in England that offers different products Nr. 1 is a spray for tents and sunshades that has 0.5% in and comes in a300ml bottle and nr 2 is a spray for clothes which is twice the price for half the amount and still only contains 0.5% Permethrin!
    question can you remember what you used on your sleeping sheets ?? Im based in holland and the only info ive found here om Permethrin is at the Horse vets!
    Saying that are there any dutch members out there that have any suggestions ? words of wisdom ?
    Also i'd like to thank everybody who's replyed this is my first forum post and iT's great to read the different advice/reactions !
    greetings patrickien

    #16 Posted: 26/7/2009 - 01:53

  • kiwibc

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    I used something similar to this kit (it might have been the same one as it looks familiar but it's been a while now so not 100% sure ;-))

    http://www.shoptraveldoctor.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=124

    bought in NZ from the local travel doctor. It's meant for a pair of trousers and shirt but I just did two sleeping sheets out of it.

    #17 Posted: 3/8/2009 - 17:19

  • patrickien

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    Thanks Kiwibc for the reply,I reckon I'll just try the same trick.
    Greetings patrickien

    #18 Posted: 3/8/2009 - 17:46

  • BruceMoon

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    patrickien


    When kiwibc suggested permethrin, I figured that as soon as you went looking for the product and spoke to retailers, they'd wise you up.

    Apparently not.

    I suggest you might like to consider the fact that...

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has classified permethrin as a likely human carcinogen because it causes lung tumors

    It is one thing to treat mosquito nets with permethrin - where body contact is extremely minimal, it is entirely another thing to treat sheets or clothing that you will be in contact with for hours or longer.

    Perhaps because European countries are a bit more advanced in the control of dangerous chemicals than poor old New Zealand explains why you are having difficulty obtaining same.

    Cheers

    #19 Posted: 3/8/2009 - 19:14

  • patrickien

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    Bruce , thanks very much for the info on Permethrin, as you know retailers are in it for the dosh and not our health!!It starts to get complicated, I sent a mail to "Sawyer" the american company that sells permethrin and they replyed stating that they can send stuff over in the post but the EU classes Permethrin as a pesticide and could confiscate it, therefore Its not available in the shops!! But I found that in England I can buy it over the counter at the company "Nomad outdoor". Good old England is only part of the EU when it suits them!
    Im of to see me folks in Manchester next week and thought I'd pop down to the Nomad store, but after second thougthts Methinks i'll give it a miss! Thanks again, greetings patrickien

    #20 Posted: 23/8/2009 - 18:34

  • BruceMoon

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    patrickien

    Idea 1>

    re: bed bugs, I was wondering whether newer, perhaps more affluent, accommodation may present with less of a problem than older establishments.

    Idea 2>

    In my post at #11, above, I made reference to ti-tree oil. The other day I was speaking to a friend with kids, who was saying she mixed ti-tree oil with alcohol and treated her kids pillows with it so minimise head lice.

    Given this, I wonder if you got yourself a sleeping sheet and loaded it up with ti-tree oil. That may form a natural barrier against bed bugs. If you did this, I'd suggest two points...

    1 - buy some ti-tree oil and try it out on 9say) a pillow first to see if you can sleep with the oil aroma (it's strong, and you may not yet be used to it, and

    2 - if you can sleep with ti-tree oil so close (I can, but you may not), get a good polythese (not plastic) bag to store your sleeping sheet and get a bottle of ti-tree oil & alcohol to 'refresh' the sheet as you travel.

    You'll never know till you give it a go...

    Cheers

    #21 Posted: 23/8/2009 - 19:34

  • BruceMoon

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    polythese... polythene

    Where's the *** EDIT button?

    anyway...

    #22 Posted: 23/8/2009 - 19:36

  • BruceMoon

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    ps pat...

    Please believe me when I suggest my recommendation for ti-tree oil isn't my reaction against the **** groundsmen who can't make a decent pitch and may, in fact, have been paid to allow the pitch to crack up by the 4th innings: a decent ump should award against the groundsmen.

    Next time, mate, it's gunna be here.

    #23 Posted: 23/8/2009 - 19:43

  • patrickien

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    g'day Bruce,for idea 1 , they reckon there as much at home in high class as low class establishments anyway I'm going to be travelling in the 8 to 10 usd range!!so ill have to take me chances.
    Idea 2 weve got an aussie outlet shop a few kliks down the road so im going to try the pillow suggestion.
    Idea 3 see if you can persaude Shane Warne and Steve Waugh to make a come back!!
    Chin up !
    greetings patrickien

    #24 Posted: 25/8/2009 - 02:03

  • BruceMoon

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    Idea 3

    The idea of the 2SW's making a comeback suggests you want to win by a greater margin next series.

    :(

    Cheers

    #25 Posted: 25/8/2009 - 05:11

  • MADMAC

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    "Perhaps because European countries are a bit more advanced in the control of dangerous chemicals than poor old New Zealand explains why you are having difficulty obtaining same."

    Actually Bruce, they're more advanced in controlling everything. The Nanny state is truly alive and well in Western Europe. It's one of the reasons I had to leave.

    #26 Posted: 25/8/2009 - 11:37

  • BruceMoon

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    John (MAC)

    There's a long-standing and prolific 'discussion' in the academic literature about governing ideologies (esp. Europe versus US).

    A central issue in that literature is a fundamental philosophical issue: are capitalists interested in the welfare of their customers?

    As less than 30% of US citizens actually bother to vote at gov't elections, those that do tend to have deep seated capitalist or religious sentiments (or both). As a result, voters have (over time) endorsed capitalist type candidates who advance the interests of capitalism over people's property and personal rights.

    Europe (on the other hand) with a recent history of Social Democracy (the outcome of Socialism & Liberalism), war, and totalitarian regimes appealing to sectional interests, are on masse more interested in gov't ideological structures than their US counterparts.

    The collective sentiment of Europeans has been towards gov't intervening in when the maretplace impacts on people's property and personal rights. This staement was more apparent leading up to the millenium than now. But, the residual remains.

    Call the European nations 'nanny states' if you like, but at least the ordinary European citizen has gov't more on its side that US citizens.


    As has emerged from the above 'discussion', the US citizen has no protection from US gov't support for chemical companies dumping unhealthy product on their lap.

    Cheers

    #27 Posted: 25/8/2009 - 12:04

  • kiwibc

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    A point to note on this is unless you're eating organically you're likely to be ingesting this stuff anyway as it's used on food crops. And it's most potent as a carcinogen when it's sprayed on stuff as it's poorly absorbed through the skin. But yes personally, I wouldn't be sleeping in sheets soaked in the stuff long term but if I had my doubts about a place re. bed bugs I wouldn't be taking chances. I only used the sleeping sheet a few times in dodgy places on the roads so I reckon personally the trade off for me was ok. I'd say the DEET people inhale when they spray the insect repellent directly on their skin sounds more harmful especially as as it has similar affects on mammals as Permethrin....funny Europe hasn't banned that yet though isn't it? :-)

    #28 Posted: 6/9/2009 - 11:41

  • mitchell456

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    A guy who seemed to know a lot at the Markets in Darwin told me that a mix of Dettol and Baby-oil would keep bed-bugs away. I had been nitten 2 weeks previously in Brisbane, but as soon as I had some clue as to what could work, I smothered myself in it every night (after the horse had bolted, so to speak).

    It is a strong smell, but I think that kind of deterent seems to work for bugs and mzzies from what I have read.

    Bruce, I'll be in KL next week, travelling as lightly as you have suggested, with the additional of an eye-brow pencil.

    The only thing I am missing is the roll-on Lemon Eucalyptus oil. I dont have time to buy it online.

    Would I be able to get it on the Gold Coast (I fly out from there) or in KL?
    I imagine trying to take my mix of Dettol and baby-oil in my cabin luggage along with the other liquids I need, would just attract attention, and go over my allowable liquid limit on Air Asia.
    Is the lemon eucalyptus as good as, or better than citronella?

    thanks
    Michelle (Adelaide)
    PS: I read the whole section on Asian squat toilets (now I know what my friends had been trying to tell me)....my big question is: if I'm wearing light colored clothes to keep the mozzies away, it could be a mistake when it comes to wearing them in the places described in that forum...

    #29 Posted: 9/10/2009 - 21:44

  • mitchell456

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    m

    #30 Posted: 9/10/2009 - 21:50

  • patrickien

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    I loooove the smell of Dettol!!! I'm litrally addicted to the stuff, ave worked as a dog handler and always used it for disinfecting kennels, and in the UK we grew up with the stuff so thanks for the tip ,I'll let you know if it turns out to be the golden one!!
    cheers

    #31 Posted: 11/10/2009 - 02:13

  • Puggles

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    Given that people are saying that Dettol is good to use as a deterrant (and obviously if you are bittne) will pine oil also suffice?

    I have some pine oil that was sent to me from a friend in the US and it smells exactly like our Dettol. I believe they have the same main ingredients.

    #32 Posted: 11/10/2009 - 10:27

  • mitchell456

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    I dont know whether pine oil is good or not to deter bed bugs or not - perhaps try googling and see what comes of it. I guess if its the ame ingredients. Maybe even better if its not as chemically created as dettol possibly is.

    If you stand the bed legs in cans with water in them - I have heard online (but dont know) that they cant climb up through the water...if they are already in the seams of the bed (which is where they like to hide til you get in there with them) then its too late, so I guess the best thing we can do is:
    - be vigilant in spotting them in the first place (after my experience, I checked every seam in every bed with my LED torch before my bags even touched the floor.
    - dont put your stuff on the bed
    - wear strong repellant
    -make sure that you dont transfer them to another Hostel or place you go to (especially not home in your luggage)
    - take steps to ensure that they get cleared out of the room youre in so that others after you dont have to suffer as well

    If you find that you have them in your room after you have been there for a while - they may have crawled into the seams in your bags and clothes. In this case, you may need to:
    - wash clothes in HOT water
    - throw your luggage out so that you dont move them onto the next destinatio
    - My next stop after the Hostel with bugs was a Hotel so that I could recuperate in privacy, so I:
    - buy some very inexpensive camphor in a supermarket, and slept with it near my feet and head , and put some in my luggage
    - froze my shoes in the Hostel freezer (in strong plastic bags so as not to transfer germs) cos I didnt want to throw my shoes out
    - make sure that you report the bugs to the people who manage the place so that they can do something about them (be prepared that they know and pretend that they didnt)
    - bought some bi-carb soda ($1.25) and slathered my bites in a paste made with bi-carb and water, and left it on over night, every night for 3 nights. It took a lot of the pain out of them. Then I slathered on the Dettol and baby oil mixture (it turns white when you mix them) every night. The Dettol also helped to keep infection out of the bites that I had scratched like crazy.. I cannot describe how painful and itchy it was. having been bitten by sand flies and mosquitoes as a way of life in Australia - I had no idea that these little critters cold have such a nasty bite.
    - I also wanted to use natural oils to heal the bites and sores, so I googled again and after much looking, found some cream in Woolies (NATRALIA "Nourish Eczema & Psoriasis Cream" 50g, in a white and green tube, $14) with lots of natural oils in them - I searched til I found one with the ingredients that I wanted (it has Aloe Vera - for healing, liquorice, evening primrose oil, chamomile oil - to soothe, vitamin E - healing, Borax. It was a cream for psoriasis and eczema. I just kept putting this on whenever the bites started itching. It helped and stopped me itching as much.

    Its also a good idea to have alook online as to what they look like, so you know when you see them - theyre kind of flat, and a brownish color, much larger than I thought.

    AFTER I had googled like crazy to find out what had bitten me, and what I was looking for (I was worried it might be something like scabies, which needs a specific treatment or you just wont get rid of them) I went looking for them in the beds, and found heaps of them. Much of what I have said above came from an hour or so of googling to find out what to do. It was probably too late as I had been bitten but I wanted to know how to treat the bites and hot to deter them.

    THEN I noticed the tin cans around the bed legs (the water had dried up) - I had thought that they must have been for ants.

    THEN I noticed the old blood stains on the sheets that I had been given (where people have scratched like crazy and bled after ward).

    Good Luck and I trust that you never have to deal with these critters - theyre mean little fellas!

    Michelle (still in Adelaide but only til Thursday)

    #33 Posted: 11/10/2009 - 14:51

  • Puggles

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    Eeergggh! I am becoming paranoid about bed bugs now. Why can't it just be simple, like you spray some Aerogard and they go away!

    #34 Posted: 11/10/2009 - 15:12

  • mitchell456

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    I reckon...just be careful - I have travelled and stayed in Hostels all over the world and in Oz for decades, and only ONCE had this experience - and that has been the ONLY negative experience I have ever had while travelling, so if we keep it in context - one could be very lucky, to have just one (not so terrible case of bites from something that WONT actually kill you) less-than-pleasant experience, as I have been (lucky)!

    ....Better to have bed bugs than Dengue fever infected mozzies - which is my next hurdle.

    Once you know what youre looking for (what they look like and the signs), it just becomes part of the routine when booking into a Hostel that you may not be sure about...like checking out to see if the bathrooms are useable. :)

    Good luck Puggles....and dont forget the ...err. Dettol /pine oil / aeroguard :) (not sure if youre old enough to remember that Aeroguard TV commercial)

    Michelle

    #35 Posted: 11/10/2009 - 15:24

  • patrickien

    Click here to learn more about patrickien
    Joined Travelfish
    21st July, 2009
    Location Netherlands
    Posts: 23

    Hi Michelle,you really got stuck into the problem!! like you said it's down to making a checklist for arrival, between all the different info thats been supplied that shouldn't be to much of a problem, I dont know any solutions for dengue but one tried and trusted solution for itching mossie bites is dark rolling tobaco mixed with your own spit/saliva and then rubbed on the bite,works a treat ! and Ithink I'll customize a few cans and get a bottle of Dettol when i get there it'll most probably be easier to find than Pine tree oil. ok tahnks for the post ,and happy (bite free) travels

    #36 Posted: 11/10/2009 - 16:49

  • Puggles

    Click here to learn more about Puggles
    Joined Travelfish
    31st August, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 59

    Thanks Michelle!

    As for age, old enough to have known the commercial and young enough to still want to have adventures.... avagoodweekend ;)

    #37 Posted: 12/10/2009 - 05:44

  • mitchell456

    Joined Travelfish
    26th September, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 18
    Total reviews: 2

    Hey Puggles

    We must be of similar vintage! and attitude :)

    have you sen the other forum on this site relating to bed bugs - it's a "sticky"
    Im not sure what that means - I think that it's a popular enough subject to be called something special..?

    Anyway - there's more stuff there.

    happy travels - Im off to SEAsia for my first time on Thursday ..

    Im smiling on the inside - a lot

    Michelle

    #38 Posted: 12/10/2009 - 17:31

  • Puggles

    Click here to learn more about Puggles
    Joined Travelfish
    31st August, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 59

    Thanks Michelle. :) I saw the sticky about bed bugs and was still hoping to find out more.

    For example, a friend has told me horror stories of a train trip she toook from Hanoi to Hue (? I think) and the train bunk had bed bugs. Obviously the drink cans wouldn't be able to be used in this situation and as my husband and I will be doing a lot of bus and train travel I was hoping to find out a few more tips to keep them at bay.

    Another friend has suggested something called 'Bushmans' which is a repellant of some sort??? Have you heard of this?

    I hope your trip is wonderful. You must try to log on whilst over there and keep everyone updated with hints and tips and what you see.

    We don't head off for another 2 weeks. I am very (im)patiently waiting until the day arrives!

    #39 Posted: 13/10/2009 - 09:07

  • mitchell456

    Joined Travelfish
    26th September, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 18
    Total reviews: 2

    Hi Puggles,

    Im not sure if drink cans will do it - they may be able to hop (if its a ring-pull).

    The idea is that they drown, so the gap needs to be wide enoug - I also read somewhere that you can vaseline the bed legs (so they slip off!?) - I know this works with cockroaches (a container like a butter dish with something attractive t them like cucumber or beer in it - tyhey get and if the insides of the container are greased - they slip back down intot he container - I have used this effectively. Killing them is next - hwo do you kill a container-full of innocent (yes, I ahve Buddhist tendencies) cockroaches. When I did this - about 20 years ago - the only way I could think to do it was to pour boiling water on them and leave them out for the birds, ants etc.

    anyway - back to bed bugs..the idea of a sleep sheet (Somtam said this in a previous post?) sounds like a good idea - I noticed that I only got bitten on skin that was uncovered - mainly legs (it was March in Brisbane)...so I guess if they can't get in, they can't bite you. Checking to see if they're there initially of course is best.

    We do sound s bit paranoid don't we?! (well, I do). I had no idea they and their nasty bites existed til a few months ago. The sound of me scratching myself under the sheets in dormitories (plus the smell of the Dettol and babyoil) must have been quite amusing for my room-mates after that in other hostels :)

    I think about a couple of young (19-20 or so) European guys who were put in a dorm room with me..they didnt speak much Engligh and here's an old girl like me scratching herself under the sheets, and smelling quite odd each night... hehe. If I have given mature Australian women a reputation here..sorry. O fcourse, when I tried to explain (hand language - pointing to bites etc) that also must have freaked them out - possibly thinking that I had some dreadful disease that they may catch.. come to think of it - this may have been fodder for interesting stories to tell when they got home.

    I Like Bruce Moon's Tea-tree oil and Iodine sduggestions also - but I havent used them. Plain old vinegar may also help ..after they have bitten (if they do )that is..(I never underestimate the power of vinegar when it comes to helping skin things), and hair things, and cleaning things etc

    I shall post here if I get a chance.
    I fly to the Gold Coast in the morning, in readiness for my trip, so my posts will dwindle after tonight..not that Ive lost inteerst int he subject of course - just that I'll be sans-****! :)

    I am sooo looking forward to visiting a totally different society than ours. I've been to 'safe' western countries and also to Japan about a decade ago, but that is nothing like what Im about to experience..its starting to become real - and all I did was put a date in my diary and buy myself a birthday present a few months ago - amazing how that works :)

    Enjoy your trip also!

    Michelle

    #40 Posted: 13/10/2009 - 14:53

  • pax

    Joined Travelfish
    12th November, 2007
    Posts: 4

    I was traveling at some point along a Korean girl who had some previous bed bugs experiences. We checked in a (cheap) guesthouse in Vientiane and she dared to ask if their rooms are bed-bug-free.

    Then, we found this in the room: http://alex.dordeduca.ro/?p=203
    A secret warning notice left by other travelers.
    (post is in Romanain but you only need to check the photos).

    #41 Posted: 13/10/2009 - 15:14

  • somtam2000

    admin
    Click here to learn more about somtam2000
    Joined Travelfish
    21st January, 2004
    Location Indonesia
    Posts: 7046
    Total reviews: 24
    Places visited:
    At least 113

    Following video recommended to me by Graham over at Project Wander -- the video speaks for itself!

    #42 Posted: 13/10/2009 - 15:23

  • mitchell456

    Joined Travelfish
    26th September, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 18
    Total reviews: 2

    Thanks fotr this Somtam...Well - after that you-tube, I am sooo glad that I threw my luggage out after being bitten in that Hostel.

    To think that I could have transferred them to other Hostels and then HOME is more than I could bear. UGH

    PS:Pax - I couldnt see the thing you were referring to from that link that you sent.. good idea - leaving a warning for incoming guests.

    PPS: I really can spell - -I think my keyboard is playing up...or maybe Im so excited (and a little bit nervous) about my trip in the next coupe of days that Im just missing keys :)

    #43 Posted: 13/10/2009 - 15:36

  • mitchell456

    Joined Travelfish
    26th September, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 18
    Total reviews: 2

    So, I have now travelled in Malaysia, Singapore, and am in Cambodia ( Phnom Penh , now Siem Reap ).
    What a culture shcok. Thank goodness I had pre-organised a guest house and a driver beforehand to help me through the intial landing in a new country (that would blow my mind) phase.
    My driver in Phnom Penh (complete with morotbike - imagine my surprise when I got picked up by bike at the airport- I laughed all the way to the guest house), babysat me through a host of things, like being mobbed each time I opened my purse near the Russian market, he organised a tuk tuk and a 50kg bag of rice -.to take me to the orphanage that I will be working at, bus, accommodation and driver at Siem Reap etc etc.
    So, I have what I have learned is usual - a very sore throat from going to aircon - heat - back to aircon (planes, shops mainly in Singapore and Malayasia) etc) and fumes from being on the back of a bike and tuk tuk, but the experience is rich.
    I am so grateful for the tips I read about on Travelfish beforehand - it helped me through a lot of stuff...ever grateful to learn beforehand about travelling light (my luggage weighed 3.4kg when I left Australia- - is still only 4kgs.
    Anyway, Im having a great time, feel safe and looked after, able to contribute (helped a young man start his own 1-day tour business to his village where his parents live, will be in the orphanage next week).
    I have no idea how I will settle back into the society that I have come from - but will worry about that whe I get back to Adelaide.

    thats it for now..

    Michelle (finally in Asia)

    #44 Posted: 24/10/2009 - 13:23

  • scottyheath-
    er

    Joined Travelfish
    30th March, 2008
    Posts: 89

    Oh dear lord. I really, really, REALLY wish I hadn't clicked on Sontam's video link.......... hmmmmm

    #45 Posted: 30/11/2009 - 13:19

  • mitchell456

    Joined Travelfish
    26th September, 2009
    Location Australia
    Posts: 18
    Total reviews: 2

    Yes, it's a very comprehensive video, isn't it!?
    Well, I am back from Asia, and have already booked my next trip (Apr2010)...for longer this time.

    I fell in love with Cambodia and the people there.

    No mishaps at all....I do have the scars of new bed bug bites however (Thailand, from a Lonely Planet preferred Guest House :)

    Anyone like to rent a flat by the beach in Adelaide so I can support myself while I'm away??

    I am so grateful for reading Bruce Moon's posts about travelling light..I weighed in with just 3.4kgs when leaving Adelaide airport, and weighed in at just 10kgs (and had purchased additional baggage for 25kgs which I didn;t need!)( upon my return. Heh - travelling light was one of the BEST things that I did for myself.

    Asia is amazing...but I'm not telling anyone here anything that they don't already know.

    Michelle (life will never be the same)

    #46 Posted: 30/11/2009 - 18:55

  • grasshopper-
    322

    Joined Travelfish
    30th September, 2009
    Posts: 25

    I just returned home after a 6 week tour of Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand. Somewhere along the way (I think Laos) I was bitten numerous times - legs, upper arms - hands, butt...someone told me that they might have been sandflies but I'm leaning now more towards bed bugs or fleas. Problem is that my body is not getting rid of them...spoke to my boss who happens to be a physician....she is going to give me a short course of some steroids - said my body is just over reacting to them and that dermatologists often use steroids to break the cycle. Similar bites have caused the same time of reaction to me...my body just kicks into high gear for some reason. Next trip overseas I will take some steroids with me in cause it happens again.

    #47 Posted: 3/1/2010 - 04:54

  • Vicbowling

    Joined Travelfish
    13th May, 2010
    Posts: 2

    A friend of mine in new york recently ended up with bed bugs in her apartment and her arms and legs were absolutely covered with bites. She couldn't figure out what the problem was at first but eventually had to call in the pest control people. It's not a laughing matter, bed bugs new york are a really big problem.

    #48 Posted: 13/5/2010 - 01:56

  • Vicbowling

    Joined Travelfish
    13th May, 2010
    Posts: 2

    Actually if you do end up with bed bugs new york these people can actually do something about it (standard pest control): http://www.standardpest.com/NY-Bed-bug-service-treatment.html

    #49 Posted: 13/5/2010 - 01:59

  • beemeers

    Joined Travelfish
    26th November, 2007
    Location Canada
    Posts: 15

    After being in southeast asia for the past 2 months, and encountering bed bugs many times, luckily we didn't get bit that much, we check the seams of the bed, and if there are any blood marks on the mattress we get outta there.

    #50 Posted: 13/5/2010 - 11:24

  • apriljune

    Joined Travelfish
    1st June, 2010
    Posts: 13

    absolutely we can find bed bugs in on the roads.
    so every time your from work, party, malls, beaches and etc. make sure
    you take a bath every time you got home. to avoid bed bugs at home.

    #51 Posted: 1/6/2010 - 17:13

  • Deadbedbugs

    Joined Travelfish
    18th September, 2010
    Location United Kingdom
    Posts: 1

    Unfortunately bed bugs are something that every traveller is going to encounter at some point. Numbers are increasing at a dramatic rate new york is having real problems at the moment and there is no sign of things getting better anytime soon.

    #52 Posted: 19/9/2010 - 03:49

  • oscarcat

    Joined Travelfish
    11th November, 2008
    Location Cambodia
    Posts: 66

    #53 Posted: 21/9/2010 - 00:25

  • Indoluso

    Joined Travelfish
    22nd December, 2009
    Posts: 133

    Only got bedbugs once in the whole trip, to stay away from them stick to good looking hotels. Just got them in the only not so good looking hotel. We were 3 so hotel prices got really down devided by 3, thus no need to stay in dirty places... no bedbugs!

    #54 Posted: 21/9/2010 - 05:15

  • danceswithr-
    ose

    Joined Travelfish
    12th October, 2010
    Posts: 20
    Total reviews: 6

    Words of wisdom.
    Ask to look at the room prior to paying. If it doesn't look good, then go somewhere else. I have paid high end and lowend prices for places. In 3 months have never had a problem.

    If you are still worried, look on the internet to find out what you can do/take for them, do that, put it in the background and just have a good trip.

    #55 Posted: 28/12/2010 - 16:12

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