Preah Khan

Rambling and exquisite

No pic at the moment -- Sorry!

What we say: 4.5 stars

Completed in 1191, the fascinating site of Preah Khan was built during the reign of Jayavarman VII and dedicated to his father (he dedicated nearby Ta Phrom to his mother). Inscriptions also make reference to a lake of blood, which could refer to a battle in the area during the expelling of the Cham from Angkor. (The Cham king was killed where Preah Khan now stands). Thought to have been a religious university, when completed Preah Khan was home to in excess of 1,000 teachers, and had its own baray which ran out to the east of the site, but which has since run dry.

Sitting among the ruins here, watching the sun set through the trees surrounded by bird-filled skies can be truly magical (until the security guards chuck you out, anyway). The inner sanctuary here, like many of Jayavarman VII's creations, is a hodgepodge maze of ponds and shrines, and while there is a straightforward path that you can take walking due east or west, there is no shortage of minor trails and pathways that you can wander through.

Some of the apsaras here remain in excellent condition as do a couple of the lintels. The central stupa that sits in the central sanctuary is particularly photogenic. Most people enter Preah Khan from the west, but it is easily done from the east as well. Whichever way you do it, it is a good idea to ask your moto to wait for you at the other side to save you having to walk back.

Last updated: 12th October, 2014


Angkor interactive map

Click on the map below to open a new window with a zoomable interactive map of Angkor, including (where available) points of interest, guesthouses & hotels, restaurants and more.


Map data © OpenStreetMap contributors, Mapbox Terms & Feedback

Travelfish reader reviews

There have been no reviews written by Travelfish readers so far.
Why don't you start the ball rolling?

Photo gallery

Photo for Angkor

Jump to a destination

Most popular sights in Angkor