Photo: Early morning views off the coast of Amed.

Snorkelling

The snorkelling in Amed is reasonable, with coral (mostly dead), an abundance of fish and pretty clear waters at many of the beaches -- this is a major reason that many come to the area.


Photo of Snorkelling

Snorkelling can be done at most of the beaches in the Amed area, but the best are at the eastern end of Jemeluk next to the hill, at Selang in front of Good Karma and at the Japanese shipwreck in Banyuning. The water in these locations is the clearest, has the most coral and greatest amounts of fish.

The Coral Garden at Jemeluk is without question the most popular snorkelling site, and can get extremely crowded, especially on weekends -- we saw at least 100 people in the water on a Sunday in July! The coral is mostly dead, but there are plenty of fish and, if you drift off into the deeper water you may see some big schools of fish (along with divers slowly passing underneath you). The main attraction of the Japanese shipwreck is that it is rare that a wreck is close enough to the surface to allow easy snorkelling over it.

Hotels often rent gear to their own guests but refuse to rent to non-guests, in which case you can rent from a roving vendor or one of the dive shops. The dive shops have better gear, but will charge a little more for it (in our experience). Expect to pay 20,000 to 30,000 for mask and snorkel, 30,000-40,000 with fins as well.



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Last updated on 30th July, 2015.


Location map for Snorkelling

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The place commonly referred to as Amed isn’t a single town but a string of quaint beachside fishing villages stretching about 15 kilometres along the dry and rugged northeastern coast of Bali. It’s a world away from the busy tourist centres in South Bali such as Kuta, Seminyak and Ubud.

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See below for more sights and activities in Amed that are listed on Travelfish.org.


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