Camp Carol

Not much left

No pic at the moment -- Sorry!

What we say: 1.5 stars

This was the largest fire-support base for the Marines, established on a hill with the elevation of 241 metres (the Vietnamese call it 241 Tan Lam). It was named after Captain Carol, the first American Marine to be killed in the area during the conflict, on a nearby ridge. In 1969 it was transferred from the Americans to the South Vietnamese Army and during the Easter Offensive in April, 1972, it was heavily shelled by the NVA. On the third day of the siege the commander of the 56th regiment of the South Vietnamese army, Lt. Col. Pham Van Dinh, surrendered his troops and 24 big guns to the north. Seeing the inevitable fall of the south on the horizon, he defected to the Northern Army and made radio broadcasts urging other southerners to do the same. Since his chief concern was to prevent the massive fatalities he knew would ensue were they to keep fighting, he is still regarded highly by the Vietnamese, irrespective of their loyalties during the war.

There is nothing left on the spot but a monument built by the government. There is a circular concrete foundation not far from it that some think may have been a gun placement, but others say it may have been built by the French.

The Camp is 27 km from Dong Ha. Along Highway 9, at 24 km, heading west from Dong Ha, there's a weathered sign on the left for Cao Diem 241 Tam Lam. Turn left and continue to the monument at the top of the hill, three kilometres up the road.

Last updated: 30th January, 2008


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