Photo: Lakey Peak on a small day.

Sumbawa is so big, we’ve split it up into areas, select one of the below for detailed accommodation and food listings in that area. Sights and general overviews for Sumbawa as a whole can be found via the icons above. Don’t know where to start? Read an overview of Sumbawa’s different areas.

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Eat and meet



While most accommodation in Lakey Peak will offer simple food, some generally better options in the form of a few simple cafes, warungs and bars line the length of the beach. The boardwalk makes it easy to wander the length of the beach to see what tickles your fancy.


Two of our favourites are at opposite ends of the beach. Ali’s Bar sits at the far north, just where the scrabbly road runs down to the sand from the main road. Wedged between the fancy wooden houses and the beachfront, very friendly Ali serves up good beach snacks (try the spring rolls) and ice-cold beer. He was building a few rooms out back when we visited in early 2016 and if they’re as good as the rolls, this will be worth checking out. A great spot to escape the midday heat.

Spring rolls at Ali’s.

Spring rolls at Ali’s.

Right down at the southern end of the beach sits Fat Mah’s. A delightful layabout wooden house with a long bench out front makes for a social scene while overlooking the gardens and the surf beyond. This was probably the most popular spot when we visited, with generous servings of food, a solid breakfast and real coffee. Cold beer also.

A hop, skip and a jump north of Fat Mah’s is Puma. It has some ramshackle rooms running back in the lawn garden, but the small restaurant out front is worth the climb — both for the view and their cold drinks. Prices are reasonable for the standard, though we preferred the better presented fare at Fat Mah’s.

Sashimi at Lakey Beach Inn.

Sashimi at Lakey Beach Inn.

A little north again is The Wreck – easy to pick as it is a boat out of water that has been converted into a Tex Mex place doing surprisingly good Mexican food. We went in with low expectations and the enchiladas blew us out of the water — Sumbawa and Mexican rarely appear in the same sentence, but this is definitely worth a hit. There’s also a pool table.

North again will take you to a cluster of beach shacks and to Mama’s, where you can get basic one-plate Indonesian fare at good prices. We didn’t try here, but it is popular and, if you’re saving money by eating local, swing by.

Rainy day flat white at Fat Mah’s.

Rainy day flat white at Fat Mah’s.

Last but not least, and way back down at the southern end of the beach, is the long-running Lakey Beach Inn. Long famous for its sashimi, the service can be hit and miss as it swings between being deserted — we thought the place had been abandoned the first time we visited — and moderately busy. The sashimi is good and the drinks cold, but we preferred elsewhere.

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Where to next?

Where are you planning on heading to after Pantai Lakey? Here are some spots commonly visited from here, or click here to see a full destination list for Indonesia.


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