Photo: We didn't catch the name of this one.

Other waterfalls

Several waterfalls can be found in the hills surrounding Sen Monorom, all within easy reach whether you’re running your own transport or hiring. The loveliest one we found was actually enroute during a trek we did from the village of Batung. It was a gorgeous spot absolutely throbbing with butterflies. We didn’t get the name, and it’s only accessible on treks.


You have to go on a trek from or to Butong village to get to this one.

You have to go on a trek from or to Butong village to get to this one.

We can safely say, though, that you can give the Sen Monorom Waterfalls a skip. The area around them was festooned with litter, and we were heartbroken by the elephant there, who is still rigged for carrying passengers, which is not okay.

Dirty, dirty, dirty.

Dirty, dirty, dirty at Sen Monorom waterfall.

We did’t make it to the Kbal Phei falls, around 25 kilometres northwest of Sen Monorom. These are larger than Monorom, and right next to the Domrai Choan village. We’d recommend going with a guide to make sure you don’t get lost.

Which is exactly what we did when we went in search of Romanear falls. The Romanear II falls are no longer accessible as they are now within the domain of a planned hydroelectric dam. However, Romanear to the southwest of Sen Monorom, is. If you follow Route 76 out of town, then take a left just under a kilometre after the turn off for Oromis Resort (and the bridge) onto a pinetree-lined dirt road. There are old, tattered signs for the falls, but underneath a burning sun, and in the absence of clear signage, we eventually threw in the towel. This road is huge fun if you happen to have hired a dirt bike and know what you’re doing. We suggest going here with a guide or tour operator.

The forests around Dak Dam are lovely.

The forests around Dak Dam are lovely.

Twenty kilometres southeast of Sen Monorom, the Dok Dam falls are much easier to find — though still not easy. Follow National Route 76 out of town, towards Phnom Penh, and then turn left at the large junction that is just under three kilometres from the centre of town — the High Street.

Dak Dam waterfall from the top.

Dak Dam waterfall from the top, during a very, very dry season.

Follow the excellent road for just over 12 kilometres, and you’ll see a left turn onto a dirt road. Continue driving, and stay to the left as the road curves up before turning down to your right on a sandy track that will lead you straight to Dok Dam village, and from there straight on to the waterfall. It’s a small fall, surrounded by forest and thick with ferns. A lovely spot for a picnic.


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Last updated on 15th May, 2016.


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Cambodia's "Wild East" contains some of the most remote yet remarkable areas in the country. A highlight is the Mekong riverside town of Kratie and its nearby Irawaddy dolphins, but the more intrepid can explore Mondulkiri and Ratanakiri provinces to see waterfalls, a crater lake and go trekking through serious jungle. Designed for the first-time visitor, this travel guide includes detailed maps plus accommodation, food, activities and transport information for Kompong Cham, Kratie, Stung Treng, Banlung and Sen Monorom.

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See below for more sights and activities in Sen Monorom that are listed on Travelfish.org.


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