Turtle Conservation and Education Centre

Turtle Conservation and Education Centre

Saving turtles in Bali

More on Sanur

What’s not to like about seeing cute baby turtles being given a good start in life and older injured ones nursed back from ill-health?

Travelfish says:
So, you come here often? Photo by: Sally Arnold.
So, you come here often? Photo: Sally Arnold

Serangan Island is no longer an “island”, land has been reclaimed and now it’s just a bump on the coastline (ahhh, we remember the days when you could only go by boat...), and the area is somewhat developed, but local turtles still think its a good place to lay their eggs (mostly between July and October), the centre collects the eggs from the busy tourist beaches, and raises the hatchling until they are ready to start the big journey into the ocean alone, know in turtle conservation speak as “the lost years”.

The centre keeps the young turtles for one month to give them a little bit of an edge, and holds back any runts or sickly hatchlings until they are a bit stronger (whether they should be released as soon as they are hatched, is cause for debate in turtle conservation circles but TCEC follows advice from The Turtle Hospital, Florida USA), and this gives you (yes you, dear reader) the opportunity to “adopt a turtle”.

Important work done good. Photo by: Sally Arnold.
Important work done good. Photo: Sally Arnold

Sorry you can’t take one home, but for 150,000 rupiah you can take part in their release into the sea. Release programs run when they have hatchlings (obviously) usually between the months of July and October, generally mornings from 09:00-10:00 and afternoons 15:00-17:00. If you are keen to take part in this programme, call first to check there are some ... Travelfish members only (Full text is around 600 words.)

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Reviewed by

Sally spent twelve years leading tourists around Indonesia and Malaysia where she collected a lot of stuff. She once carried a 40kg rug overland across Java. Her house has been described as a cross between a museum and a library. Fuelled by coffee, she can often be found riding her bike or petting stray cats. Sally believes travel is the key to world peace.

Tours in Indonesia



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Belanjong Inscription

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