Photo: Always brush daily.

Museum Gedong Arca

Our rating:

The region east of Ubud comprising the villages of Bedulu, Pejeng and Tampaksiring is one of the most archaeologically significant locales in Bali. Offering an overview of this ancient history is a small archaeology museum, the Museum Gedong Arca, in the village of Bedulu.



The area has been settled since the Bronze Age (and likely earlier) and today tourists can visit the ancient sites of Goa Gajah, Yeh Pulu, Gunung Kawi and Tirta Empul, as well as some significant temples including Pura Penataran Sasih which houses the “Moon of Pejeng” the largest known Bronze-age relic in the world, a drum believed to have been made around 300 BC.

Simple, striking displays. Photo taken in or around Museum Gedong Arca, Ubud, Indonesia by Sally Arnold.

Simple, striking displays. Photo: Sally Arnold

At the time of our visit in January 2017, the museum had been newly renovated, but the artefacts had not yet moved to their new home, however we were still able to view the somewhat eclectic collection ranging from Neolithic tools, Bronze and Iron Age artefacts through to Chinese ceramics as well as some rather lovely small eighth century Buddhist terracotta stupas and early Buddhist and Hindu stone carvings. The labelling was a bit hodgepodge, and not all in English, however that may change with the new installations.

The newly built section incorporates four small Balinese-style enclosed buildings and a central open pavilion that will house the larger sculptures within a walled courtyard. An adjacent courtyard accessed via a stately Paduraksa style gateway displays the most impressive artefacts in the collection, large sandstone sarcophagi. Bronze-age artefacts found in some coffins dates them to around 300 BC, but others may be much older, perhaps Neolithic. The large two-part mostly egg-shaped vessels would have enclosed a corpse in foetal position, a posture associated with reincarnation. Most are one to one-and-a-half metres long, although a couple of longer two metre sarcophagi would have had the bodies placed in a prostrate position. Some of the sarcophagi are unadorned, and several have carved stone heads protruding from one end.

Shards of life. Photo taken in or around Museum Gedong Arca, Ubud, Indonesia by Sally Arnold.

Shards of life. Photo: Sally Arnold

Particularly striking is one carved with female genitalia, and another in the shape of two turtles, one on top of the other (significant in Hindu mythology). A small collection of bones found in the coffins is on display. As well as the body, the sarcophagi would have contained tools and jewellery for the afterlife.

The museum provides guides who can offer some insight as to what you’re looking at (although they were all at lunch when we dropped by and the less-knowledgeable security guard showed us around). The museum is free to enter after you sign the visitors book at the office. Your guide will expect a small tip.

Although small, Museum Gedong Arca is worth a quick stop as you visit the antiquities around Ubud and discover the beginnings of Balinese civilisation. Museum Bali in Denpasar, showcases an even larger collection of Bali’s cultural artifices.



Museum Gedong Arca
Six kilometres east of Ubud, Jalan Raya Tampasksiring, Bedulu
Mon–Fri 08:00–16:00 Closed weekends and holidays.
T: (0361) 942 347 
Admission: Free

By .

Location map for Museum Gedong Arca

Popular attractions in Ubud

A selection of some of our favourite sights and activities around Ubud.



Best places to stay in Ubud

A selection of some of our favourite places to stay in Ubud.


What next?

 Browse our independent reviews of places to stay in and around Ubud.
 Check prices, availability & reviews on Agoda or Booking
 Read up on where to eat on Ubud.
 Check out our listings of other things to do in and around Ubud.
 Read up on how to get to Ubud.
 Do you have travel insurance yet? If not, find out why you need it.
 Planning on riding a scooter in Ubud? Please read this.
 Browse tours in Indonesia with Tourradar.




Like what you see? Then you’ll love our newsletter

The Travelfish newsletter is sent out every Monday and is jammed full of free advice for travel in Southeast Asia. You can see past issues here.


See below for more sights and activities in Ubud that are listed on Travelfish.org.


Top of page