Photo: Very under rated.

Textiles Museum

Our rating:

Set over the second and third floors of the Pavilion, it showcases the diversity of Sarawak through the medium of textiles.


Photo of Textiles Museum

Even if you aren’t that interested in textiles, the building is worth a visit in itself as it’s a great example of colonial architecture.

The second floor houses different examples of indigenous textiles, such as the Iban ikat and the Ulu people’s fabric made from tree bark. It also houses some of the finest indigenous weaving we’ve ever seen, not to mention beautiful antique Iban headdresses. Other ethnic groups are not missed out here either; gossamer-light Chinese embroidery sits alongside handwoven Malay cloth. While all this is rather beautiful, the fridge-cold air-con, inadequate lighting and stone-faced wax human models can lend itself to creating an atmosphere of a bad Asian horror film set.

Rather more cheery, but still with waxworks featuring, the third floor shows wedding ceremony tableaux from all the major ethnic groups in Sarawak. We were struck by how similar many of these outfits were, thus demonstrating the symbiotic nature of cultural evolution in Sarawak.


What next?

 Browse our independent reviews of places to stay in and around Kuching.
 Check prices, availability & reviews on Agoda or Booking
 Read up on where to eat on Kuching.
 Check out our listings of other things to do in and around Kuching.
 Read up on how to get to Kuching.
 Do you have travel insurance yet? If not, find out why you need it.
 Planning on riding a scooter in Kuching? Please read this.
 Browse tours in Malaysia with Tourradar.


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