Baan Bat monk bowl village

Baan Bat monk bowl village

A unique glimpse into Bangkok's past

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Historic sites are often the main draw for travellers, but exploring ancient neighbourhoods built around important historic landmarks can sometimes be even more fascinating than the sites themselves. While wandering the narrow side streets around Wat Saket, we stumbled on the gritty but intriguing temple supply neighbourhood of Baan Bat, where locals have crafted monks begging (alms) bowls continuously since the 1700s.

Travelfish says:
Back alley Buddhas.

Back alley Buddhas.

Some of Bangkok’s oldest standing structures, the neighbourhood’s Sino-European shophouses were built in the late 1800s as part of a major building push by King Rama V. Most of the houses have remained in everyday use ever since, and though some look like they could collapse at any moment they possess a distinctly weathered charm while sagging over the often traffic-choked Bamrung Muang Road.

The buildings may be old, but they don't lack character.

The buildings may be old, but they don't lack character.

Long-running temple supply shops line Bamrung Muang’s western end, offering everything from orange fabric to be sewn into robes for monks, to candles, incense, and Buddhist chanting books, to a dizzying array of statues depicting every conceivable posture of the Buddha.

Thailand: the world's largest producer of orange fabric.

Thailand: the world's largest producer of orange fabric.

In keeping with Thailand’s intermingled spiritual cosmology, which contains not only elements of Theravada Buddhism but also Mahayana Buddhism, Hinduism and a complex tradition of spirit worship, the shops along Bamrung Muang also sell images of the Buddha’s historical disciples, famous Thai monks, Hindu deities, protective spirits, and Mahayana icons like Kuan Yin, the goddess of compassion.

Kuan Yin, providing reassurance to passing drivers as she awaits her new home.

Kuan Yin, providing reassurance to passing drivers as she awaits her new home.

Walking this part of Bamrung Muang feels like being dropped in some ancient, strangely urban fantasy world inhabited by glistening, timeless deities (and the odd bus or tuk tuk), and the area is well worth a visit just to see the temple supply shops. The most famous aspect of the neighborhood, however, is the hand-made alms bowl community of Baan Bat.

Tucked down a small side street off Bamrung Muang, Baan Bat has been home to a small group of locals who have made their livings for centuries by producing hand-made alms bowls to be purchased by the faithful and donated to monks. The community continues to function today in the exact same location — and in much the same way — as it would have generations ago.

Ban Bat -- Keeping an ancient art alive.

Baan Bat -- Keeping an ancient art alive.

Virtually every monk in Thailand (and Burma, Laos, Cambodia and Sri Lanka) uses alms bowls to collect donations of food from the lay community each morning, a custom in place since the Buddha is believed to have lived more than 2,500 years ago. Although they’re typically factory produced in Thailand today, the Baan Bat community persists with an age-old method of crafting the bowls from slabs of raw steel using only their hands and a hammer.

For hundreds of years, the tapping of hammer on steel has been heard here.

For hundreds of years, the tapping of hammer on steel has been heard here.

Baan Bat’s locals are a charming and friendly lot, always excited to share their craft with visitors. Polished, hand-made bowls — some more than 50 years old — are available for purchase, but visitors are left with a smile whether they buy a bowl or just watch the craftspeople at work. Don't be afraid to wander all the way down the alley for a glimpse of the village spirit shrine.

A picture of pride.

A picture of pride.

Transport information

From the Giant Swing, head east on Bamrung Muang, cross the canal bridge and look for Soi Baan Bat on the right. From Wat Saket, exit through the eastern gate and take a right on to Thanon Worachak. After a short distance turn right on to Bamrung Muang at the first traffic light, then continue another 100 or so metres before turning left down Soi Baan Bat. It's easily missed -- if you hit the bridge spanning the canal you've gone too far.

It can also be reached by bus 508, and the nearest khlong taxi stops at Tha Phan Fah.

Contact details for Baan Bat monk bowl village

Address: Bamrung Meuang Rd, Soi Baan Bat, Bangkok
Coordinates (for GPS): 100º30'23.36" E, 13º45'4.9" N
See position in Apple or Google Maps: Apple Maps | Google Maps

Reviewed by

David Luekens first came to Thailand in 2005 when Thai friends from his former home of Burlington, Vermont led him on a life-changing trip. Based in Thailand since 2011, he spends much of his time eating in Bangkok street markets and island hopping the Andaman Sea.

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