Photo: Lazing by the river.

Wat Ong Tue

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Located a couple of km north of Tha Bo and 43 km west of Nong Khai, Wat Ong Tue houses the largest and arguably most beautiful Buddha image in the province.


Photo of Wat Ong Tue

Made from an alloy of gold, silver and bronze, the namesake seated Buddha is four metres tall and was cast by a king of Nakhon Wiang, a long-since disappeared minor kingdom, way back in 1562. With its sparkling gold headdress, the image is nothing short of stunning. Along with Luang Phor Sai at Wat Pho Chai, Luang Phor Ong Tue is one of Nong Khai’s two most sacred Buddha images.

The pleasant temple grounds are set alongside a Mekong tributary, with two massive Bodhi trees hanging over the river. The temple is probably not worth visiting on its own unless you’re really into ancient Buddha images, but it’s an easy detour while on a motorbiking trip to Sri Chiang Mai and Sangkhom.


How to get there
Take the riverside road west from Nong Khai and merge right onto Route 212 in the town of Tha Bo. Head straight north from there and watch for signs for "Luang Pho Phra Chao Ong Tue" pointing down a side road to the left, not long after passing over a small bridge. The temple is a km down the road, on the other side of the river. It's an easy walk from the main road to the temple, but you'll have to wait a while for the next bus or songthaew in either direction.

Wat Ong Tue

43 km west of Nong Khai

Location map for Wat Ong Tue

What next?

 Browse our independent reviews of places to stay in and around Nong Khai.
 Check prices, availability & reviews on Agoda or Booking
 Read up on where to eat on Nong Khai.
 Check out our listings of other things to do in and around Nong Khai.
 Read up on how to get to Nong Khai, or book your transport online with 12Go Asia.
 Do you have travel insurance yet? If not, find out why you need it.
 Planning on riding a scooter in Nong Khai? Please read this.
 Browse tours in Thailand with Tourradar.

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