Mae Wong National Park

Mae Wong National Park

Get out there

More on Kamphaeng Phet
Around 20 kilometres further south past Khlong Lan village, Route 1117 ends at Mae Wong National Park -- not to be confused with Mae Wang National Park in Chiang Mai province.
Travelfish says:

A remote 894 square kilometres of pristine forest that stretches all the way south into Nakhon Sawan province and west to Tak’s Umphang district, Mae Wong is worth the effort if you want to get way out into the wilderness. While the park includes several waterfalls, the best require a two-night, three-day trek to reach. If you can manage that, the falls at Mae Gee crash over a 200 metre cliff, making it one of Thailand’s tallest. Not quite as dramatic, Mae Rewa Waterfall flows over a sloped rock face into a wide pool that’s great for swimming.

Smaller falls and rapids can be found several kilometres down a narrow, partially paved road that runs through a valley rimmed on either side by old-growth jungle. We believe that this road was once intended to continue all the way to Umphang, an isolated district in Thailand’s far western frontier, but the plan was scrapped when environmentalists resisted in the 1990s. Rumour is that it’s possible to undertake a seven-day trek along the planned route of this road, ending up in Umphang town. Bring a Thai speaker and chat up the rangers if you’re interested.

Also within the park’s boundaries is the formidable Khao Mokoju mountain, which soars to 1,964 metres and requires a five-day trek to the summit. A more manageable viewpoint is Chong Yen, reputed to be an outstanding sunset perch located 28 kilometres from park headquarters along the only road. On the way you might spot a wild jackal, porcupine, exotic bird (the park has around 450 avian species), orchids and rare flowers that grow in the high altitudes.

A campground, basic accommodation, restaurant and small hot spring pool are available near park headquarters, where a helicopter landing pad draws attention to just how remote Mae Wong is. If visiting by car or motorbike, you’ll need to fill out a form at headquarters before heading further into the park. Though maps and brochures are only provided in Thai, rangers at the visitor centre can speak limited English and it’s possible to arrange guided treks. Tents can be rented for 200 baht while the bungalows start at 1,500 baht and can sleep five or more people.

Reviewed by

David Luekens first came to Thailand in 2005 when Thai friends from his former home of Burlington, Vermont led him on a life-changing trip. Based in Thailand since 2011, he spends much of his time eating in Bangkok street markets and island hopping the Andaman Sea.

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Our top 8 other sights and activities in and around Kamphaeng Phet

Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park: Central zone
Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park: Central zone

Don’t miss the elephant statues

Kamphaeng Phet National Museum
Kamphaeng Phet National Museum

An excellent collection

Kamphaeng Phet Riverfront
Kamphaeng Phet Riverfront

Take it easy the local way

Khlong Lan National Park
Khlong Lan National Park

Cool off in the jungle

Wat Phra Borommathat
Wat Phra Borommathat

Ancient riverside temple