Photo: Drying out on the streets of Khorat.

Things to see and do

Ya Mo Monument
Between Ratchadamnoen and Chumphon Rds, Nakhon Ratchasima

Statues of Thai historical figures don’t often compel us to write up attraction listings, but it’s impossible to ignore the constant fervour commanded by the Ya Mo Monument in the heart of Khorat. Ya Mo (“Grandma Mo”) was the wife of a local assistant governor when Prince Anuwong of Vientiane invaded Khorat in 1826, seizing the city and enslaving its residents. As the story goes, Ya ... Read more about Ya Mo Monument .

Maha Viravong National Museum
350m south of Ya Mo on the west side of Ratchadamnoen, Nakhon Ratchasima
T: (044) 242 958

Khorat’s Maha Viravong National Museum displays a modest collection of Buddha images and other artefacts on the grounds of Wat Sutthachinda. Covering a single room, the museum is far smaller than you might expect for the capital of a huge province with such a rich history; that’s because most of the area’s relics have ended up at Phimai’s far more extensive national museum. Even so, ... Read more about Maha Viravong National Museum .

Wat Phra Narai Maharat
Between Assadang and Chomphon Rds

Rising from the middle of a pond in a quiet corner of the old quarter, Wat Phra Narai Maharat is a large Theravada Buddhist temple that’s most notable for a Hindu shrine. ... Read more about Wat Phra Narai Maharat .

Wat Phayap
Towards the northern end of Chumphon Rd, just northeast of Ya Mo, Nakhon Ratchasima

Wat Phayap is worth a visit to check out a “cave” that was created by plastering sparkling rocks to a concrete frame. The one-of-a-kind shrine room materialised in the 1990s, when Wat Phayap’s abbot began collecting shiny stones that cement companies were blasting out of mountains over in Saraburi province. The monk created a cave-like room beneath his residence, fastening the rocks all ... Read more about Wat Phayap .

Wat Sala Loi
3 km northeast of Ya Mo

Established by Ya Mo and her husband in 1827, Wat Sala Loi is a highly revered temple that received quite a makeover in the 1970s. The highlight of the “Temple of the Floating Pavilions” is a large wihaan designed in a contemporary Thai style with sharply slanting roofs and walls that are supposed to create the feel of a ship riding the waves. Adorning the outer walls, ceramic tiles from ... Read more about Wat Sala Loi .

Prasat Hin Phanom Wan
18 km northeast of downtown Khorat, Nakhon Ratchasima province

Receiving far less attention than its big sister up in Phimai, Prasat Hin Phanom Wan is an ancient Khmer sanctuary located in a tranquil spot near Khorat city. Believed to hail from the 11th century, the minor site probably served as a stop off for travellers heading from Angkor to Phimai. ... Read more about Prasat Hin Phanom Wan .

Dan Kwian pottery village
20km southeast of Khorat city, off Highway 224, Nakhon Ratchasima province

Pottery studios, shops and museums line the streets of Dan Kwian, a rural town set along the Moon River some 20 kilometres southeast of Khorat city. Harvested from the Moon, the clay used here turns to a distinctive rusty orange-red after being fired in the kilns. Long ago, members of the Kha ethnic minority group from the Mekong River basin noticed the potential value of the clay and taught ... Read more about Dan Kwian pottery village .

Pak Thong Chai
25 km south of Khorat off Highway 304, Nakhon Ratchasima province

The small city of Pak Thong Chai is filled with family-run silk studios, some of which were patronised by American silk baron, Jim Thompson, in the mid 20th century. The area remains one of Thailand’s largest silk production centres, with several large factories and countless small studios churning out both modern and traditional silk products. Shops sell all sorts of silk wears and ... Read more about Pak Thong Chai .

Where to next?

Where are you planning on heading to after Nakhon Ratchasima? Here are some spots commonly visited from here, or click here to see a full destination list for Thailand.

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